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dc.contributor.authorKhurshid, Maheenen
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-16T09:00:22Zen
dc.date.available2021-01-16T09:00:22Zen
dc.date.issued2021-01-15en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:27589en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/101941en
dc.description.abstractBorder delineations and walls have been used to protect cities and towns throughout history. In the present age of modern surveillance and advanced military technology however, physical walls have much less significance for the protection of present-day states and nations and have become artifacts of mostly symbolic significance. In an increasingly connected world with the potential for becoming more compassionate, the symbolic significance of the border wall, barrier, and delineation demands to be reassessed and reapproached. This opens the possibility of designing a new binational border typology with functions of business, tourism, cultural education, hospitality, and public assembly that can mutually benefit bordering regions. The site of this thesis is the 1949 Armistice Agreement, or Green Line, on the perimeter of the West Bank of Palestine – a prolonged border conflict of our time and a powerful example of spatial injustice. Through a combination of ancient and modern materials, this thesis explores the potential of hospitality through the design of a roadside inn to recognize the history of its place and create a physical and symbolic bridge for future cooperation. In addition to lodging for travelers, the program incorporates a museum, artist workshops, dining areas, gift shops, and gathering spaces. Straddling the Green Line along the Dead Sea shoreline, it is designed to carry the memory of the land, but also to symbolize a future that joins divided communities.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectArchitectureen
dc.subjectSpatial Justiceen
dc.subjectSpaceen
dc.subjectPoweren
dc.subjectBordersen
dc.subjectWallsen
dc.subjectTwinsen
dc.subjectWest Banken
dc.titleArchitecture as Living Memory: Building Across Bordersen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentNot founden
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
dc.contributor.committeechairEmmons, Paul F.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPiedmont-Palladino, Susan C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberLa Coe, Jodi Lynnen
dc.description.abstractgeneralThis thesis looks at the problem of border delineations and walls within a modern context and proposes the use of borders for functions supplementary to border control and security – such as local commerce, cultural spaces, tourism, hospitality, and public gathering places. Border delineations and walls have been used to protect cities and towns throughout history. In the present age of modern surveillance and advanced military technology however, physical walls have much less significance for the protection of present-day states and nations and have become artifacts of mostly symbolic significance. In an increasingly connected world with the potential for becoming more compassionate, the symbolic significance of the border wall, barrier, and delineation demands to be reassessed and reapproached. This opens the possibility of designing a new binational border typology with functions of business, tourism, cultural education, hospitality, and public assembly that can mutually benefit bordering regions. Spatial justice involves the fair and equitable distribution within a space of resources and opportunities. The site of this thesis is the 1949 Armistice Agreement, or Green Line, on the perimeter of the West Bank of Palestine – a prolonged border conflict of our time and a powerful example of spatial injustice. Through a combination of ancient and modern materials, this thesis explores the potential of hospitality through the design of a roadside inn to recognize the history of its place and create a physical and symbolic bridge for future cooperation. In addition to lodging for travelers, the project's program, or scope of work, includes a museum, artist workshops, dining areas, gift shops, and gathering spaces. Straddling the Green Line along the Dead Sea shoreline, it is designed to carry the memory of the land, but also to symbolize a future that joins divided communities.en


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