Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTrammell, Tara L. E.en
dc.contributor.authorPataki, Diane E.en
dc.contributor.authorPouyat, Richard, Ven
dc.contributor.authorGroffman, Peter M.en
dc.contributor.authorRosier, Carlen
dc.contributor.authorBettez, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorCavender-Bares, Jeannineen
dc.contributor.authorGrove, Morgan J.en
dc.contributor.authorHall, Sharon J.en
dc.contributor.authorHeffernan, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorHobbie, Sarah E.en
dc.contributor.authorMorse, Jennifer L.en
dc.contributor.authorNeill, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorSteele, Meredithen
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-07T18:23:50Zen
dc.date.available2021-04-07T18:23:50Zen
dc.date.issued2020-05en
dc.identifier.issn0012-9615en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/102975en
dc.description.abstractIn urban areas, anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem structure and function are thought to predominate over larger-scale biophysical drivers. Residential yards are influenced by individual homeowner preferences and actions, and these factors are hypothesized to converge yard structure across broad scales. We examined soil total C and total delta C-13, organic C and organic delta C-13, total N, and delta N-15 in residential yards and corresponding reference ecosystems in six cities across the United States that span major climates and ecological biomes (Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Los Angeles, California; Miami, Florida; Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; and Phoenix, Arizona). Across the cities, we found soil C and N concentrations and soil delta N-15 were less variable in residential yards compared to reference sites supporting the hypothesis that soil C, N, and delta N-15 converge across these cities. Increases in organic soil C, soil N, and soil delta N-15 across urban, suburban, and rural residential yards in several cities supported the hypothesis that soils responded similarly to altered resource inputs across cities, contributing to convergence of soil C and N in yards compared to natural systems. Soil C and N dynamics in residential yards showed evidence of increasing C and N inputs to urban soils or dampened decomposition rates over time that are influenced by climate and/or housing age across the cities. In the warmest cities (Los Angeles, Miami, Phoenix), greater organic soil C and higher soil delta C-13 in yards compared to reference sites reflected the greater proportion of C-4 plants in these yards. In the two warm arid cities (Los Angeles, Phoenix), total soil delta C-13 increased and organic soil delta C-13 decreased with increasing home age indicating greater inorganic C in the yards around newer homes. In general, soil organic C and delta C-13, soil N, and soil delta N-15 increased with increasing home age suggesting increased soil C and N cycling rates and associated C-12 and N-14 losses over time control yard soil C and N dynamics. This study provides evidence that conversion of native reference ecosystems to residential areas results in convergence of soil C and N at a continental scale. The mechanisms underlying these effects are complex and vary spatially and temporally.en
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. National Science FoundationNational Science Foundation (NSF) [EF-1065548, 1065737, 1065740, 1065741, 1065772, 1065785, 1065831, 121238320]en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsPublic Domainen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/en
dc.subjectnatural abundance carbon stable isotopesen
dc.subjectnatural abundance nitrogen stable isotopesen
dc.subjectresidential yard managementen
dc.subjectsoil C cyclingen
dc.subjectsoil N cyclingen
dc.subjecturban residential yardsen
dc.titleUrban soil carbon and nitrogen converge at a continental scaleen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Plant and Environmental Sciencesen
dc.description.notesThe authors thank La'Shaye Ervin, William Borrowman, Moumita Kundu, and Barbara Uhl for field and laboratory assistance. This research was funded by a series of collaborative grants from the U.S. National Science Foundation (EF-1065548, 1065737, 1065740, 1065741, 1065772, 1065785, 1065831, 121238320). The authors appreciate valuable comments by anonymous reviewers on a previous version of the manuscript.en
dc.title.serialEcological Monographsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/ecm.1401en
dc.identifier.volume90en
dc.identifier.issue2en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
dc.description.adminPublic domain – authored by a U.S. government employeeen
dc.identifier.eissn1557-7015en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Public Domain
License: Public Domain