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dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Kyleen
dc.contributor.authorWind, Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorKrometis, Leigh Anne Henryen
dc.contributor.authorHession, W. Cullyen
dc.contributor.authorPruden, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-20T15:19:50Zen
dc.date.available2020-01-20T15:19:50Zen
dc.date.issued2019-07-01en
dc.identifier.issn0047-2425en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/96496en
dc.description.abstractGiven the presence of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in livestock manures, it is important to identify the key pathways by which land-applied manure-derived soil amendments potentially spread resistance. The goal of this field-scale study was to identify the effects of different types of soil amendments (raw manure from cows treated with cephapirin and pirlimycin, compost from antibiotic-treated or antibiotic-free cows, or chemical fertilizer only) and crop type (lettuce [Lactuca sativa L.] or radish [Raphanus sativus L.]) on the transport of two antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs; sul1 and ermB) via storm runoff from six naturally occurring storms. Concurrent quantification of sediment and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB; Escherichia coli and enterococci) in runoff permitted comparison to traditional agricultural water quality targets that may be driving factors of ARG presence. Storm characteristics (total rainfall volume, storm duration, etc.) significantly influenced FIB concentration (two-way ANOVA, p < 0.05), although both effects from individual storm events (Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.05) and vegetative cover influenced sediment levels. Composted and raw manure-amended plots both yielded significantly higher sul1 and ermB levels in runoff for early storms, at least 8 wk following initial planting, relative to fertilizer-only or unamended barren plots. There was no significant difference between sul1 or ermB levels in runoff from plots treated with compost derived from antibiotic-treated versus antibiotic-free dairy cattle. Our findings indicate that agricultural fields receiving manure-derived amendments release higher quantities of these two “indicator” ARGs in runoff, particularly during the early stages of the growing season, and that composting did not reduce effects of ARG loading in runoff.en
dc.format.extentPages 1038-1046en
dc.format.extent9 page(s)en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Agronomyen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000474880000028&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciencesen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen
dc.subjectANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCEen
dc.subjectSWINE MANUREen
dc.subjectHUMAN HEALTHen
dc.subjectSOILen
dc.subjectFATEen
dc.subjectTRANSPORTen
dc.subjectQUANTIFICATIONen
dc.subjectTETRACYCLINEen
dc.subjectEVOLUTIONen
dc.subjectRIVERen
dc.subject05 Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subject06 Biological Sciencesen
dc.subject04 Earth Sciencesen
dc.subjectAgronomy & Agricultureen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCattleen
dc.subject.meshBacteriaen
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen
dc.subject.meshManureen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshSoil Microbiologyen
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Microbialen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshCompostingen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshBacteriaen
dc.subject.meshCattleen
dc.subject.meshCompostingen
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Microbialen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshManureen
dc.subject.meshSoil Microbiologyen
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen
dc.titleFecal Indicator Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Storm Runoff from Dairy Manure and Compost-Amended Vegetable Plotsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.date.updated2020-01-20T15:19:48Zen
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Systems Engineeringen
dc.title.serialJournal of Environmental Qualityen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2018.12.0441en
dc.type.otherArticleen
dc.type.otherJournalen
dc.identifier.volume48en
dc.identifier.issue4en
dc.identifier.orcidHession, William [0000-0002-6323-3827]en
dc.identifier.pmid31589689en
dc.identifier.eissn1537-2537en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Biological Systems Engineeringen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences/Durelle Scotten
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineeringen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering/Civil & Environmental Engineeringen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering/COE T&R Facultyen


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