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dc.contributor.authorThomson, Jessica L.en
dc.contributor.authorTussing-Humphreys, Lisa M.en
dc.contributor.authorZoellner, Jamie M.en
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Melissa H.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-21T14:50:29Zen
dc.date.available2020-04-21T14:50:29Zen
dc.date.issued2016-08en
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/97853en
dc.description.abstractObjective: Evaluating an intervention's theoretical basis can inform design modifications to produce more effective interventions. Hence the present study's purpose was to determine if effects from a multicomponent lifestyle intervention were mediated by changes in the psychosocial constructs decisional balance, self-efficacy and social support. Design: Delta Body and Soul III, conducted from August 2011 to May 2012, was a 6-month, church-based, lifestyle intervention designed to improve diet quality and increase physical activity. Primary outcomes, diet quality and aerobic and strength/flexibility physical activity, as well as psychosocial constructs, were assessed via self-report, interviewer-administered surveys at baseline and post intervention. Mediation analyses were conducted using ordinary least squares (continuous outcomes) and maximum likelihood logistic (dichotomous outcomes) regression path analysis. Setting: Churches (five intervention and three control) were recruited from four counties in the Lower Mississippi Delta region of the USA. Subjects: Rural, Southern, primarily African-American adults (n 321). Results: Based upon results from the multiple mediation models, there was no evidence that treatment (intervention v. control) indirectly influenced changes in diet quality or physical activity through its effects on decisional balance, self-efficacy and social support. However, there was evidence for direct effects of social support for exercise on physical activity and of self-efficacy for sugar-sweetened beverages on diet quality. Conclusions: Results do not support the hypothesis that the psychosocial constructs decisional balance, self-efficacy and social support were the theoretical mechanisms by which the Delta Body and Soul III intervention influenced changes in diet quality and physical activity.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research ServiceUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA) [6401-51000-001-00D]; US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources Services Administration [6 U1FRHA07411]en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsCreative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedicationen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/en
dc.subjectNutrition educationen
dc.subjectSupervised physical activityen
dc.subjectPsychosocial constructsen
dc.subjectMediationen
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen
dc.titlePsychosocial constructs were not mediators of intervention effects for dietary and physical activity outcomes in a church-based lifestyle intervention: Delta Body and Soul IIIen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Nutrition, Foods, and Exerciseen
dc.description.notesThis work was supported by the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (project number 6401-51000-001-00D); and the US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources Services Administration (grant number 6 U1FRHA07411). The views expressed are solely those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the US government.en
dc.title.serialPublic Health Nutritionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980015003602en
dc.identifier.volume19en
dc.identifier.issue11en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.type.dcmitypeStillImageen
dc.description.adminPublic domain – authored by a U.S. government employeeen
dc.identifier.pmid26797387en
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2727en


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