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dc.contributor.authorAbdelKhalek, Ahmeden
dc.contributor.authorAbutaleb, Nader S.en
dc.contributor.authorElmagarmid, Khalifa A.en
dc.contributor.authorSeleem, Mohamed N.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-21T16:12:58Zen
dc.date.available2020-09-21T16:12:58Zen
dc.date.issued2018-05-29en
dc.identifierARTN 8353 (Article number)en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.other10.1038/s41598-018-26674-0 (PII)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/100028en
dc.description.abstractMultidrug-resistant enterococcal pathogens, especially vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), are among the pathogens that require new antibiotic innovation. The colonization of the gut represents a major pathway by which VRE can cause infection and spread to other patients. In the current study, auranofin (FDA-Approved rheumatoid arthritis drug) is evaluated for its potential use as a decolonizing agent for VRE. Auranofin was found to exert potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of enterococcal clinical isolates with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/mL. No resistant mutants could be developed against auranofin over the course of 14 passages. Auranofin was also found to exert potent anti-biofilm activity against VRE. Auranofin was superior to linezolid, the drug of choice for VRE infection treatment, in the in vivo mouse model. Auranofin significantly reduced the VRE burden in feces, cecum, and ileum contents after 8 days of treatment. Accordingly, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise as a novel gastrointestinal decolonizing agent for VRE.en
dc.format.extent9 page(s)en
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectSTAPHYLOCOCCAL INFECTIONSen
dc.subjectANTIMICROBIAL AGENTen
dc.subjectDRUGen
dc.subjectRAMOPLANINen
dc.subjectBACTERIALen
dc.subjectPATHOGENSen
dc.subjectPHARMACOKINETICSen
dc.subjectCOLONIZATIONen
dc.subjectMECHANISMSen
dc.subjectPEPTIDEen
dc.subject.meshIntestinesen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshBiofilmsen
dc.subject.meshEnterococcusen
dc.subject.meshAuranofinen
dc.subject.meshVancomycinen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Testsen
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshVancomycin Resistanceen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshDrug Repositioningen
dc.subject.meshVancomycin-Resistant Enterococcien
dc.subject.meshLinezoliden
dc.titleRepurposing auranofin as an intestinal decolonizing agent for vancomycin-resistant enterococcien
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.date.updated2020-09-21T16:12:55Zen
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.title.serialScientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-26674-0en
dc.type.otherArticleen
dc.type.otherJournalen
dc.identifier.volume8en
dc.identifier.issue1en
dc.identifier.orcidSeleem, Mohamed [0000-0003-0939-0458]en
dc.identifier.pmid29844350 (pubmed)en
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-10en
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicineen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/CVM T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International