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dc.contributor.authorMohammad, Haroonen
dc.contributor.authorEldesouky, Hassan E.en
dc.contributor.authorHazbun, Tony R.en
dc.contributor.authorMayhoub, Abdelrahman S.en
dc.contributor.authorSeleem, Mohamed N.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-21T16:15:17Zen
dc.date.available2020-09-21T16:15:17Zen
dc.date.issued2019-12-12en
dc.identifierARTN 18941 (Article number)en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.other10.1038/s41598-019-55379-1 (PII)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/100036en
dc.description.abstractCandida species are a leading source of healthcare infections globally. The limited number of antifungal drugs combined with the isolation of Candida species, namely C. albicans and C. auris, exhibiting resistance to current antifungals necessitates the development of new therapeutics. The present study tested 85 synthetic phenylthiazole small molecules for antifungal activity against drug-resistant C. albicans. Compound 1 emerged as the most potent molecule, inhibiting growth of C. albicans and C. auris strains at concentrations ranging from 0.25–2 µg/mL. Additionally, compound 1 inhibited growth of other clinically-relevant yeast (Cryptococcus) and molds (Aspergillus) at a concentration as low as 0.50 µg/mL. Compound 1 exhibited rapid fungicidal activity, reducing the burden of C. albicans and C. auris below the limit of detection within 30 minutes. Compound 1 exhibited potent antibiofilm activity, similar to amphotericin B, reducing the metabolic activity of adherent C. albicans and C. auris biofilms by more than 66% and 50%, respectively. Furthermore, compound 1 prolonged survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with strains of C. albicans and C. auris, relative to the untreated control. The present study highlights phenylthiazole small molecules, such as compound 1, warrant further investigation as novel antifungal agents for drug-resistant Candida infections.en
dc.format.extent12 page(s)en
dc.format.mediumElectronicen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectSTAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS MRSAen
dc.subjectPEDIATRIC-PATIENTSen
dc.subjectIN-VITROen
dc.subjectRESISTANTen
dc.subjectANTIBIOTICSen
dc.subjectPHOSPHATASEen
dc.subjectINFECTIONSen
dc.subjectDISCOVERYen
dc.subjectBIOFILMSen
dc.titleIdentification of a Phenylthiazole Small Molecule with Dual Antifungal and Antibiofilm Activity Against Candida albicans and Candida aurisen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.date.updated2020-09-21T16:15:15Zen
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.title.serialScientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-55379-1en
dc.type.otherArticleen
dc.type.otherJournalen
dc.identifier.volume9en
dc.identifier.issue1en
dc.identifier.orcidSeleem, Mohamed [0000-0003-0939-0458]en
dc.identifier.pmid31831822 (pubmed)en
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-11-26en
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicineen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/CVM T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International