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dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Justin Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T16:02:36Z
dc.date.available2011-08-06T16:02:36Z
dc.date.issued2004-06-17en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07092004-123926en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/10013
dc.description.abstractPiezoceramic fiber composite (PFC) actuators and sensors offer many advantages over conventional monolithic piezoceramic devices. Conformable, durable and, when equipped with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), more responsive than regular monolithic devices, PFCs promise to revolutionize the application of piezoelectric materials. Developed by the NASA-Langley Research Center, the Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) actuator and sensor is the most sophisticated PFC device yet invented. With superior qualities among PFCs in performance, behavior repeatability and manufacturability, the MFC has spawned great interest in the commercial and academic community as a tool in multitudinous engineering applications. While the MFC's characteristics render it a singularly useful device, limited characterization and modeling research on the MFC exists. Empirically designed and assembled, the MFC is poorly understood, especially in terms of its underlying operating principles, its dependence on design parameters and its electrical properties. The majority of published MFC studies focus on experimental quantification of MFC mechanical and actuation properties, and the research that attempts to model the MFC relies totally on finite element analysis. Published works widely assume that analytical models of the MFC are totally impossible. Rectifying gaps in the current body of MFC research, this study presents the first accurate analytical model of the static electrical field properties of the MFC. Implementing the techniques of conformal mapping, a branch of complex analysis, the following chapters derive a closed-form, exact analytical solution describing the electrical potential field and electrical field of the MFC's dual-IDE structure. Based on the conformal mapping solution for the MFC's electrical field, the electrical field of the commercially available MFC is examined and analyzed, introducing an intuitive knowledge of the MFC's operation. Demonstrating the utility of this solution in modeling the MFC, this work also predicts the capacitance and induced strain properties of a continuum of potential MFC designs and offers final suggestions on improving the current commercial MFC design. After establishing the theoretical underpinnings of the analytical MFC model, this report derives the conformal mapping solutions for the MFC, discusses the computational application of the resulting equations and then presents the results of numerical analyses executed using the new analytical model.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectconformal mappingen_US
dc.subjectcapacitanceen_US
dc.subjectelectrostatic modelingen_US
dc.subjectactuatoren_US
dc.subjectMFCen_US
dc.titleElectrical Properties of Macro-Fiber Composite Actuators and Sensorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairInman, Daniel J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobertshaw, Harry H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeo, Donalden_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07092004-123926en_US
dc.date.sdate2004-07-09en_US
dc.date.rdate2004-07-26
dc.date.adate2004-07-26en_US


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