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dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Kristineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T16:02:42Z
dc.date.available2011-08-06T16:02:42Z
dc.date.issued2000-04-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-31798-22010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/10038
dc.description.abstractEffort and success of Virginia's bear houndsmen were determined through field and mail surveys, and hunter diaries. The number of houndsmen per chase ranged from 5 to 12, hounds ranged from 6 to 11, and each chase lasted 2 to 6 hours. Second chases of the day lasted 2 to 3 hours and 3 to 10 hounds were used. Fifty-three to 74% of all first attempts resulted in a chase and 24% to 44% of these bears treed. A 2nd chase occurred in 11% to 96% of attempts and 9% to 50% of bears treed. Five to 17% of the 1st bears and 13% to 21% of 2nd bears were harvested. Field surveys found virtually no differences in hunting effort or success between seasons, study areas, and years. The hunter diary appears to be the most reliable means of sampling hunter effort and success. The applicability of Schroeder's physical condition estimate (PCR) was tested on data from Maine's black bear population. Bears exposed to poor hard mast had lower PCR's than bears exposed to good hard mast (P = 0.009). PCR and body weights of adult female black bears in Virginia exposed to hunting did not differ from those not hunted (P = 0.09). Annual adult female, adult male, and cub survival and reproductive rates in the hunted population were numerically similar to those in the non hunted populations. Five radio collared females were experimentally chased by hounds. The chases,on average, lasted 0.9 hours and 43% of bears treed. The average total home range for 3 of the bears was 17.8 km². The area used by 2 of the 3 bears pursued by hounds did not differ from their total home range (P 3 0.05) based on the MRPP test. The area covered by 3 of the 5 pursued bears was 5.6%, 11.8%, and 79.7% of their home range.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartAPPEND1.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartAPPEND2.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartAPPEND3.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartAPPEND4.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartAPPEND5.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartETD.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartFRNTMATR.PDFen_US
dc.relation.haspartVITA.PDFen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectphysical conditionen_US
dc.subjecthoundsmenen_US
dc.subjecthome rangeen_US
dc.subjectblack bearsen_US
dc.subjectsurveyen_US
dc.subjectVirginiaen_US
dc.titleHunting dynamics, condition estimates, and movements of black bears hunted with hounds in Virginiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAccounting and Information Systemsen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAccounting and Information Systemsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairVaughan, Michael R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcMullin, Steve L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKirkpatrick, Roy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOlin, Robert F.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-31798-22010en_US
dc.date.sdate1997-12-15en_US
dc.date.rdate1999-09-01
dc.date.adate1998-09-01en_US


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