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dc.contributor.authorZagarese, Vivianen
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-16T16:00:56Zen
dc.date.available2020-11-16T16:00:56Zen
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/100875en
dc.description.abstractThere are many leadership theories that dominate the field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, however there is a lack of understanding as to which leadership processes may be most appropriate for action teams in high stress environments. Previous research has articulated leadership behaviors, but has largely ignored the temporal processes of leadership, and how it changes throughout the operating team’s tenure. The proposed study investigates two types of leadership, namely shared and autocratic leadership, that take place during critical steps of the perioperative process and relates these leadership behaviors to team dynamics and psychological processes. Specifically, this study builds upon other studies by testing how leadership behaviors are related to levels of psychological safety and the optimization of teamwork and communication among team members. We were also interested in understanding if the surgeon’s perception of past performance of their team has an impact on the amount of trust the leader has in his/her team and if this in turn, has an impact on the type of leadership utilized during the team’s tenure. As an exemplar environment, we explored these dynamics in the operating theater, which is a high stakes environment requiring both technical and non-technical skills, such as leadership, communication, and teamwork. Results show that the correlation between the surgeon’s perceived past performance of the team and the trust the surgeon has in his/her team and the relationship between team’s trust and teamwork and communication were significant at the alpha =.1 level. All other relationships were non-significant.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectleadershipen
dc.subjectpsychological safetyen
dc.subjectteam trusten
dc.subjectsurgeryen
dc.titleLeadership During Action Team Formation: The Influence of Shared Leadership Among Team Members During the Perioperative Processen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.description.degreeM.S.en
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Organizational Psychologyen
dc.contributor.committeechairFoti, Roseanneen
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neilen
dc.contributor.committeecochairParker, Sarahen
dc.description.abstractgeneralIn the field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, many leadership theories have been developed, however, there is a lack of understanding as to which type of leadership is best for teams who work in high-stress environments, such as the operating room. This study looks at two types of leadership: shared leadership and autocratic leadership. Shared leadership is when all team members emerge and have a leadership role, whereas autocratic leadership is when one person makes all the decisions without consulting other team members. Previous research has articulated leadership behaviors, but has largely ignored the temporal processes of leadership, and how it changes over time throughout the surgical procedure. This study builds upon other studies by testing how leadership behaviors are related to levels of psychological safety and the optimization of teamwork and communication among team members. We were also interested in understanding if the surgeon’s perception of past performance of their team has an impact on the amount of trust the leader has in his/her team and if this in turn, has an impact on the type of leadership utilized during the team’s tenure. As an exemplar environment, we explored these dynamics in the operating theater, which is a high stakes environment requiring both technical and non-technical skills, such as leadership, communication, and teamwork. Results show that the relationship between the surgeon’s perceived past performance of the team and the trust the surgeon has in his/her team is significant and the relationship between the trust the surgical team members have in each other and the amount that they communicate with each other is also significant.en


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International