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dc.contributor.authorAl Rufaydah, Abdullah Saeeden
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-12T09:01:11Zen
dc.date.available2021-01-12T09:01:11Zen
dc.date.issued2021-01-11en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:28531en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/101848en
dc.description.abstractCorrosion is a concern in old prestressed concrete bridges, especially bridges built in marine environments. Corrosion induces cracks in the concrete superstructure which accelerates the deterioration rate and can result in a complete loss of the concrete cover and exposure of the reinforcing and prestressing steel. This causes degradation in the load-carrying capacity of the bridge girders. Consequently, decisions need to be made on whether to replace, retrofit, or load post these bridges. Extensive research has focused on the flexural strength of corroded prestressed concrete girders. This research studies the shear strength of corroded prestressed concrete girders which can, then, be expanded further to evaluate the possible retrofitting techniques for restoring, or enhancing, their shear strengths. Two old prestressed concrete girders built in the 1960's and 1970's were delivered to the Murray Structural Engineering Laboratory at Virginia Tech from two decommissioned bridges in Virginia. The two girders showed signs of deterioration due to corrosion. Non-destructive testing was performed to evaluate their in-situ conditions. For both girders, each end was tested in the lab in three-point loading condition to make full use of the girders. Shear capacities of the girders were predicted using four methods in the current AASHTO LRFD and the ACI codes. In addition, analysis using Response2000 and strut-and-tie modelling were also carried out. Evaluation of these methods and comparisons with the experimental results were performed to reach to conclusions and recommendations for future work. Corrosion in strands seemed to not have as much influence on the shear capacity as on the flexural capacity. Destructive shear tests indicated that the actual shear capacities of the girders investigated in this research exceeded nominal capacities predicted by the current codes. However, the flexural capacities were reduced. Possible reasons for the girders' behaviors are discussed.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectCorrosion Damageen
dc.subjectShear strengthen
dc.subjectPrestressed concrete girdersen
dc.subjectBridgesen
dc.subjectForensic engineeringen
dc.subjectResidual shear strengthen
dc.titleShear Strength Assessment of Corrosion-Damaged Prestressed Concrete Girdersen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen
dc.contributor.committeechairRoberts-Wollmann, Carin L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKoutromanos, Ioannisen
dc.contributor.committeememberHebdon, Matthew Hardyen
dc.description.abstractgeneralMany bridges in the United States were built using longitudinal members, called girders, made of prestressed concrete. In prestressed concrete, because concrete cannot resist high tensile forces, tensioned steel cables, called strands, are used to produce compression on the concrete member to improve its behavior when it is in service. Corrosion is a concern in old prestressed concrete bridges, especially bridges built in marine environments. Corrosion induces cracks in the concrete superstructure which accelerates the deterioration rate and can result in a partial loss of the concrete body and exposure of the embedded steel. This causes degradation in the load-carrying capacity of the bridge girders which raises a danger to vehicles, passengers, and pedestrians. Consequently, decisions need to be made by authorities on whether to replace, repair, or load post these bridges. Two main types of loads exist in bridge girders, namely shear forces and bending moments. Extensive research has focused on the ability of corroded prestressed concrete girders to resist stresses produced by moment, or flexure. However, bridge girders must also resist shear forces. This research studies the shear strength of corroded prestressed concrete girders which can, then, be expanded further to evaluate the possible retrofitting techniques for restoring, or enhancing, their shear strengths. Two old prestressed concrete girders built in the 1960's and 1970's were delivered to the Murray Structural Engineering Laboratory at Virginia Tech from two decommissioned bridges in Virginia. The two girders showed signs of deterioration due to corrosion. These signs include concrete losses, cracks, areas of unsound concrete, and exposed strands. Non-destructive testing was performed on the girders to evaluate the severity of their in-situ conditions. Then, two destructive full-scale tests were performed on each girder in the lab to estimate their actual shear strengths. Shear strengths of the girders were also predicted using four methods present in the current American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, AASHTO, and the American Concrete Institute, ACI, codes. In addition, analyses using other advanced tools were also carried out. Evaluation of these methods and comparisons with the experimental results were performed to reach to conclusions and recommendations for future work. Corrosion in strands seemed to not have as much influence on the shear strength as on the flexural strength. Destructive shear tests indicated that the actual shear strengths of the girders investigated in this research exceeded nominal strengths predicted by the current codes, the AASHTO and the ACI. However, the flexural strengths were reduced. Possible reasons for the girders' behaviors are discussed.en


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