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dc.contributor.authorVuper, Ailie Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-31T08:00:35Zen
dc.date.available2021-03-31T08:00:35Zen
dc.date.issued2021-03-30en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:29493en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/102890en
dc.description.abstractThe Tamakoshi Dam in Nepal experienced 19 cm of settlement due to three earthquakes that took place from December 14, 2014 to May 12, 2015. This settlement caused massive damage and halted construction and was believed to have been caused by seismic compression. Seismic compression is the accrual of contractive volumetric strain in sandy soils during earthquake shaking for cases where the generated excess pore water pressures are low. The purpose of this case study is to investigate the settlements of the dam intake block relative to the right abutment block of the dam during the three earthquakes. Towards this end, soil profiles for the dam were developed from the boring logs and suites of ground motions were selected and scaled to be representative of the shaking at the base of the dam for the two of the three earthquakes which were well documented. Equivalent linear analysis was completed for the suites of ground motions to produce shear strain time histories which were then utilized in the Jiang et al. (2020) proposed procedure for seismic compression prediction. The results were found to not align with the settlement that was observed in the field, so post-liquefaction consolidation was also considered to be a possible cause of the settlement. The results from that analysis also showed that consideration of post-liquefaction consolidation did not yield settlements representative of those observed in the field. More detailed studies are recommended to assess the settlements that were observed at the dam site, particularly analyses that take into account below and above grade topographic effects on the ground motions and settlements at the ground surface.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectSeismic compressionen
dc.subjectpost-liquefaction consolidationen
dc.subjectNepalen
dc.titleCase Study: Settlement at Nepal Hydropower Dam during the 2014-2015 Gorkha Earthquake Sequenceen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen
dc.contributor.committeechairGreen, Russell A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMitchell, James K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRodriguez-Marek, Adrianen
dc.description.abstractgeneralThe Tamakoshi Dam in Nepal experienced 19 cm of settlement due to three earthquakes that took place from December 14, 2014 to May 12, 2015. This settlement caused massive damage and halted construction and was believed to have been caused by seismic compression. Seismic compression is the accrual of contractive volumetric strain in sandy soils during earthquake shaking for cases where the generated excess pore water pressures are low. The purpose of this case study is to investigate the settlements of the dam intake block relative to the right abutment block of the dam during the three earthquakes. Representative soil profiles were developed based on data collected from the site for analysis of the settlement. Two approaches were used to compute predicted settlement, one which considered only seismic compression as the cause of settlement and a hybrid method that considered both seismic compression and post-liquefaction consolidation. Both approaches predicted settlement values that were less than what was observed in the field. It was found that the ground motion prediction equations used in the analysis were not representative of the tectonic setting in Nepal and thus was the main reason for the under-prediction. The relevance of this research lies in using methodology developed in academia to analyze a real world event and draw conclusions about the methodology's applicability.en


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