Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHillborn, Robert C.en
dc.contributor.authorFriedlander, Michael J.en
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-03T19:04:39Zen
dc.date.available2021-05-03T19:04:39Zen
dc.date.issued2013-02-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/103183en
dc.description.abstractThe recent report on the Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (SFFP) and the revised Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) reframe the preparation for medical school (and other health professional schools) in terms of competencies: what students should know and be able to do with that knowledge, with a strong emphasis on scientific inquiry and research skills. In this article, we will describe the thinking that went into the SFFP report and what it says about scientific and quantitative reasoning, focusing on biology and physics and the overlap between those fields. We then discuss how the SFFP report set the stage for the discussion of the recommendations for the revised MCAT, which will be implemented in 2015, again focusing the discussion on biology and physics. Based on that framework, we discuss the implications for undergraduate biology and physics education if students are to be prepared to demonstrate these competencies.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe American Society for Cell Biologyen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.titleBiology and Physics Competencies for Pre-Health and Other Life Sciences Studentsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.title.serialCBE—Life Sciences Educationen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1187/cbe.12-10-0184en
dc.identifier.volume12en


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International
License: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International