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dc.contributor.authorNoble, Alexandria Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-08T12:35:06Zen
dc.date.available2021-10-08T12:35:06Zen
dc.date.issued2020-04-15en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:24687en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/105207en
dc.description.abstractResearchers have postulated that the implementation of driving automation systems could reduce the prevalence of driver errors, or at least mitigate the severity of their consequences. While driving automation systems are becoming increasingly common on new vehicles, drivers seem to know very little about them. The following dissertation describes an investigation of driver behavior and behavioral adaptation while using driving automation systems in order to improve consumer education and training. This dissertation uses data collected from test track environments and two naturalistic driving studies, the Virginia Connected Corridor 50 (VCC50) Vehicle Naturalistic Driving Study and the NHTSA Level 2 Naturalistic Driving Study (L2 NDS), to investigate driver behavior with driving automation systems and make suggestions for modifications to current consumer education practices. Results from the test track study indicated that while training strategy elicited limited differences in knowledge and no difference in driver behaviors or attitudes, operator behaviors and attitudes were heavily influenced by time and experience with the driving automation. The naturalistic assessment of VCC50 data showed that drivers tended to activate systems more frequently in appropriate roadway environments. However, drivers spent more time looking away from the road while driving automation systems were active and drivers were more likely be observed browsing on their cell phones while using driving automation systems. The analysis of L2 NDS showed that drivers' time gap preferences changes as drivers gain experience using the driving automation systems. Additionally, driver eye glance behavior was significantly different with automation use and indicated the potential for an adaptive trend with increased exposure to the system for both glances away from the roadway and glances to the instrument panel. The penultimate chapter of this work presents training guidelines and recommendations for consumer education with driving automation systems based on this and other research that has been conducted on driver interaction with driving automation systems. The results of this research indicate that driver training should be a key focus in future efforts to ensure the continued safe use of driving automation systems as they continue to emerge in the vehicle fleet.  en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en
dc.subjectbehavioral adaptationen
dc.subjectdriving automation systemsen
dc.subjectconsumer educationen
dc.subjecttrainingen
dc.subjectdriver behavioren
dc.titleBehavioral Adaptation to Driving Automation Systems: Guidance for Consumer Educationen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentIndustrial and Systems Engineeringen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Systems Engineeringen
dc.contributor.committeechairKlauer, Sheila G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberManser, Michael Paulen
dc.contributor.committeememberPerez, Miguel A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSrinivasan, Divyaen
dc.description.abstractgeneralWhile driving automation systems are becoming increasingly common on new vehicles, drivers seem to know very little about them. Previous studies have found that owners of vehicles equipped with advanced technologies have demonstrated misperceptions or lack of awareness about system limitations, which may impact driver comfort with and reliance on these systems. Partial driving automation systems are designed to assist drivers in some vehicle operation demands, they are not, however, designed to completely remove the driver from the driving task. The following dissertation describes an investigation of driver behavioral adaptation while using driving automation systems with the goal of improving consumer education and training.en


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