Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMattson, Thomas Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-24T08:01:28Zen
dc.date.available2022-06-24T08:01:28Zen
dc.date.issued2022-06-23en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:35199en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/110930en
dc.description.abstractHousing shortages have plagued many large North American cities and urban areas over the last several decades. In many such regions, less affluent areas are rapidly redeveloped and densified to keep up with housing demand. This frenetic development displaces lower income residents and tears apart community networks. Meanwhile, affluent areas resist development, maintaining low densities despite their relative proximities to jobs, schools, transportation networks, and other resources. Consequently, patterns of inequality which have persisted in American Cities for decades, if not centuries, remain in-tact. Furthermore, these low-density areas contribute to sprawl, car culture, habitat destruction, and other harmful social and environmental phenomena. Additionally, many of the low density urban and suburban residential neighborhoods which were developed en masse over the last century–so-called 'cookie-cutter' neighborhoods–fail to readily accommodate the diverse and ever-changing needs and circumstances of the people who currently inhabit them, having been built with outdated and inflexible notions of the 20th century ideal family in mind. This thesis explores the redevelopment of a single family residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C. By exploring the densification of the neighborhood and the addition of new programs to the suburban landscape, the thesis seeks to identify strategies by which we might one day convert massive and sprawling cookie-cutter suburbs into denser, more sustainable, and more diverse neighborhoods which serve a wider array of residents better while contributing additional housing and other resources to the broader population.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectarchitectureen
dc.subjectsuburbiaen
dc.subjectsuburbanen
dc.subjectsprawlen
dc.subjectresidentialen
dc.subjectcookie-cutteren
dc.subjecthousingen
dc.subjectprogramen
dc.titleReprogramming the Suburbsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen
dc.contributor.committeechairEdge, Kay F.en
dc.contributor.committeememberAlbright, Kathryn C.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTomer, Sharoneen
dc.description.abstractgeneralThe American obsession with single-family homeownership in the name of the 'American Dream' has led to the development of an unsustainable landscape characterized by the extreme stratification of land uses, widespread overdependence on the personal vehicle, and the continued issue of equal access to community assets and services, among many other issues. Furthermore, many extant suburban landscapes were designed with outdated and inflexible notions of the ideal family in mind, and thus they fail to meet the needs of families and individuals who don't conform to the typical family model of the 20th century. The thesis takes the stance that the 'American Dream' is an outdated ideal, and that the American suburb is, by extension, an outdated model of living in the 21st century. The thesis investigates the reprogramming of an affluent single family residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C, proposing the densification of the housing stock and exploring new urban forms which aim to build density, diversity, sustainability, and community in an existing suburban-type neighborhood.en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record