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dc.contributorVirginia Techen
dc.contributor.authorSokol, Eric R.en
dc.contributor.authorHerbold, C. W.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, C. K.en
dc.contributor.authorCary, S. Craigen
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, John E.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-10T20:07:56Zen
dc.date.available2014-01-10T20:07:56Zen
dc.date.issued2013-11en
dc.identifier.citationEric R. Sokol, Craig W. Herbold, Charles K. Lee, S. Craig Cary, and J. E. Barrett 2013. Local and regional influences over soil microbial metacommunities in the Transantarctic Mountains. Ecosphere 4:art136. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00136.1en
dc.identifier.issn2150-8925en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/24807en
dc.description.abstractThe metacommunity concept provides a useful framework to assess the influence of local and regional controls over diversity patterns. Culture-independent studies of soil microbial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of East Antarctica (77 degrees S) have shown that bacterial diversity is related to soil geochemical gradients, while studies targeting edaphic cyanobacteria have linked local diversity patterns to dispersal-based processes. In this study, we increased the spatial extent of observed soil microbial communities to cover the Beardmore Glacier region in the central Transantarctic Mountains (84 degrees S). We used community profiling techniques to characterize diversity patterns for bacteria and the cyanobacterial subcomponent of the microbial community. Diversity partitioning was used to calculate beta diversity and estimate among-site dissimilarity in the metacommunity. We then used variation partitioning to assess the relationship between beta diversity and environmental and spatial gradients. We found that dominant groups in the soil bacterial metacommunity were influenced by gradients in pH and soil moisture at the Transantarctic scale (800 km). Conversely, beta diversity for the cyanobacterial component of the edaphic microbial metacommunity was decoupled from these environmental gradients, and was more related to spatial filters, suggesting that wind-driven dispersal dynamics created cyanobacterial biogeography at a local scale (<3 km).en
dc.description.sponsorshipUS National Science Foundation OPP-0944560, OPP-1246292, OPP-0944556en
dc.description.sponsorshipNew Zealand Marsden Fund UOW0802, UOW1003en
dc.description.sponsorshipFoundation for Research, Science and Technology of New Zealand UOWX0715en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherEcological Society of Americaen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectAntarcticaen
dc.subjectbeta diversityen
dc.subjectbiogeographyen
dc.subjectdiversity partitioningen
dc.subjectMcMurdo Dry Valleysen
dc.subjectmetacommunitiesen
dc.subjectsoil microbial ecologyen
dc.subjectTransantarctic Mountainsen
dc.subjectvariation partitioningen
dc.subjectmcmurdo dry valleysen
dc.subjectpolar desert ecosystemen
dc.subjectsouthern victoria landen
dc.subjectross sea regionen
dc.subjectcyanobacterial diversityen
dc.subjectcommunity ecologyen
dc.subjecttayloren
dc.subjectvalleyen
dc.subjectbacterial diversityen
dc.subjectspatial scalesen
dc.subjectantarcticaen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen
dc.titleLocal and regional influences over soil microbial metacommunities in the Transantarctic Mountainsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Sciencesen
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/ES13-00136.1en
dc.date.accessed2014-01-08en
dc.title.serialEcosphereen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1890/es13-00136.1en


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