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dc.contributor.authorCloyd, Tristan Daneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T09:00:39Z
dc.date.available2014-01-30T09:00:39Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-29en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:2048en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/25221
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation addresses user responses to the introduction of Brain-Computer Interface technologies (BCI) for gaming and consumer applications in the early part of the 21st century. BCI technology has emerged from the contexts of interrelated medical, academic, and military research networks including an established computer and gaming industry. First, I show that the emergence and development of BCI technology are based on specific economic, socio-cultural, and material factors, and secondly, by utilizing user surveys and interviews, I argue that the success of BCI are not determined by these contextual factors but are dependent on user acceptance and interpretation. Therefore, this project contributes to user-technology studies by developing a model which illustrates the interrelations between producers, users, values, and technology and how they contribute to the acceptance, resistance, and modification in the technological development of emerging BCI technologies. This project focuses on human computer interaction researchers, independent developers, the companies producing BCI headsets, and neuro-gadget companies who are developing BCI's for users as an alternative interface for the enhancement of human performance and gaming and computer simulated experience. Moreover, BCI production and use as modes of enhancement align significantly with social practices of play which allows an expanded definition of technology to include cultural dimensions of play.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectBrain-Computer Interfaceen_US
dc.subjectElectroencephalographyen_US
dc.subjectNeurofeedbacken_US
dc.subjectHuman-Computer interactionen_US
dc.subjectVideo Gamesen_US
dc.subjectUser-Technology Studiesen_US
dc.subjectPlayen_US
dc.title(r)Evolution in Brain-Computer Interface Technologies for Play: (non)Users in Minden_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentScience and Technology in Societyen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairPitt, Joseph C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarrison, James W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLaberge, Ann F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuhrman, Ellsworth R.en_US


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