Show simple item record

dc.contributorVirginia Techen_US
dc.contributor.authorSocha, J. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, W. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, J. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWaters, J. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFezzaa, Kamelen_US
dc.contributor.authorWestneat, M. W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-07T18:29:41Z
dc.date.available2014-02-07T18:29:41Z
dc.date.issued2008-11-01
dc.identifier.citationSocha, John J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F.; et al., "Correlated patterns of tracheal compression and convective gas exchange in a carabid beetle," J Exp Biol 211, 3409-3420 (2008); doi: 10.1242/_jeb.019877
dc.identifier.issn0022-0949
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/25347
dc.description.abstractRhythmic tracheal compression is a prominent feature of internal dynamics in multiple orders of insects. During compression parts of the tracheal system collapse, effecting a large change in volume, but the ultimate physiological significance of this phenomenon in gas exchange has not been determined. Possible functions of this mechanism include to convectively transport air within or out of the body, to increase the local pressure within the tracheae, or some combination thereof. To determine whether tracheal compressions are associated with excurrent gas exchange in the ground beetle Pterostichus stygicus, we used flow-through respirometry and synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging to simultaneously record CO(2) emission and observe morphological changes in the major tracheae. Each observed tracheal compression (which occurred at a mean frequency and duration of 15.6 +/- 4.2 min(-1) and 2.5 +/- 0.8 s, respectively) was associated with a local peak in CO(2) emission, with the start of each compression occurring simultaneously with the start of the rise in CO(2) emission. No such pulses were observed during inter-compression periods. Most pulses occurred on top of an existing level of CO(2) release, indicating that at least one spiracle was open when compression began. This evidence demonstrates that tracheal compressions convectively pushed air out of the body with each stroke. The volume of CO(2) emitted per pulse was 14 +/- 4 nl, representing approximately 20% of the average CO(2) emission volume during x-ray irradiation, and 13% prior to it. CO(2) pulses with similar volume, duration and frequency were observed both prior to and after x-ray beam exposure, indicating that rhythmic tracheal compression was not a response to x-ray irradiation per se. This study suggests that intra-tracheal and trans-spiracular convection of air driven by active tracheal compression may be a major component of ventilation for many insects.
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences DE-AC02-06CH11357
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCompany of Biologists Ltd.
dc.subjectBeetleen_US
dc.subjectConvectionen_US
dc.subjectGas exchangeen_US
dc.subjectImagingen_US
dc.subjectSynchrotron x-rayen_US
dc.subjectTrachealen_US
dc.subjectCompressionen_US
dc.subjectAcid-base statusen_US
dc.subjectInsect respirationen_US
dc.subjectActive regulationen_US
dc.subjectNervous-systemen_US
dc.subjectVentilationen_US
dc.subjectPhaseen_US
dc.subjectPupaeen_US
dc.subjectDiffusionen_US
dc.subjectFlighten_US
dc.subjectGrasshoppersen_US
dc.titleCorrelated patterns of tracheal compression and convective gas exchange in a carabid beetleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.urlhttp://jeb.biologists.org/content/211/21/3409.full.pdf+html
dc.date.accessed2014-02-04
dc.title.serialJournal of Experimental Biology
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.019877
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record