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dc.contributor.authorJones, Cravoren
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:07:56Zen
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:07:56Zen
dc.date.issued2005-02-08en
dc.identifier.otheretd-03032005-185442en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/26348en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the factors that contributed to the job satisfaction of African American counselors (AAC). Although there are a variety of job satisfaction studies regarding mental health professionals, a literature review indicated research related to the job satisfaction of AACs was negligible. Knowing the factors that contribute to minorities' occupational satisfaction is especially important for mental health organizations because the information helps managers recruit and retain AACs. Subjects were 182 currently employed AACs who were members of American Counseling Association (ACA). A modified version of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) and a Data Information Form (DIF) were used to collect data. The following research questions were studied: What were the aggregate levels of job satisfaction expressed by African American Counselors? Which of the 20 subscales on the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) were rated as being important to AACs' job satisfaction? Which select demographic variables contributed significantly to the job satisfaction of AACs? It was determined that 87% of participants in this study were satisfied or very satisfied with their current job. Only 13% of subjects indicated they were dissatisfied. Subjects were satisfied with 19 of 20 job facets. Social service was the only facet subjects indicated they were very satisfied with, and advancement was the only facet subjects indicated they were dissatisfied with on their current job. An analysis of demographic variables revealed two significant associations: subjects who were not planning to leave their profession within the next 5 years were satisfied with their job, and subjects who indicated sexism did not affect their job were more satisfied with their current position. Overall, the results from this research indicated AACs were satisfied in their current position.en
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.relation.haspartczj.pdfen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectAfrican American Counselorsen
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen
dc.titleFactors Affecting African American Counselors' Job Satisfaction: A National Surveyen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen
dc.description.degreePh. D.en
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen
dc.contributor.committeememberCropper, Dennisen
dc.contributor.committeememberGetz, Hilda M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBenson, Mark J.en
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-03032005-185442/en
dc.contributor.committeecochairHohenshil, Thomas H.en
dc.contributor.committeecochairBurge, Penny L.en
dc.date.sdate2005-03-03en
dc.date.rdate2006-03-16en
dc.date.adate2005-03-16en


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