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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Charles Edwarden
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:09:17Zen
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:09:17Zen
dc.date.issued2007-04-05en
dc.identifier.otheretd-04102007-220540en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/26751en
dc.description.abstractSituated within the belief that faculty development is a key institutional mechanism through which colleges and universities will be able to meet emerging social, cultural, and technological challenges in the coming years, this study sought to better understand the underlying psychological processes that facilitate the adoption of innovations by teaching faculty and GTAs in higher education. Specifically, three types of self-efficacy (college teaching, teaching with technology, and general) were considered in light of demographic variables and Rogersâ model of the innovation-decision process. Most significant among the findings were that women have significantly higher college teaching self-efficacy and general self-efficacy than men; however, men have higher teaching with technology self-efficacy. Those in their forties, fifties and sixties have higher college teaching self-efficacy than those in their twenties. Full-time instructors have higher college teaching self-efficacy than doctoral GTAs and assistant professors. Those who rate themselves as having higher computer skills also have higher teaching with technology self-efficacy. When considering teaching with technology self-efficacy and instructional technology-based innovation-decision stage, it was found that this type of self-efficacy differs significantly between most stages and consistently increases from the knowledge stage through the confirmation stage.en
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.relation.haspartWatson_Dissertation.pdfen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectfaculty developmenten
dc.subjectinnovation-decision processen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectchangeen
dc.subjectdiffusion of innovationsen
dc.titleSelf-efficacy, the Innovation-Decision Process, and Faculty in Higher Education: Implications for Faculty Developmenten
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentTeaching and Learningen
dc.description.degreePh. D.en
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and Instructionen
dc.contributor.committeechairLockee, Barbara B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDoolittle, Peter E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBurton, John K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWildman, Terry M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, David M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHead, J. Thomasen
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04102007-220540/en
dc.date.sdate2007-04-10en
dc.date.rdate2012-10-11en
dc.date.adate2007-04-19en


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