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dc.contributor.authorGao, Huaiyingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:10:27Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:10:27Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-18en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04222005-182413en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/27130
dc.description.abstractThe use of still images in instruction has a long history in the field of education. With the widespread use of microcomputers and the development of graphic software, the ability to create and use animated images has greatly increased; today many people use animated images in their teaching and training activities. Since the use of different types of images in instruction has various influences on studentsâ learning results, the different effects between animated images and still images have been studied widely among researchers. However, the research results are not consistent. Some research results show that animated images are more effective than still images and some show no difference or less effective results. This experimental study explores the effects of animated images and still images on college studentsâ learning of motion-related tasks and non-motion related tasks, with the students possessing different levels of field dependence-independence. This study found that: For learning tasks involving motion and/or change, animated images were more effective than still images for college students, and field dependent students benefited more from animated images than did the field independent students. However, for learning tasks that did not involve motion or change, there was no difference in learning results from the use of still images as opposed to animated images. In addition, for such learning tasks, there was no difference in the learning benefits of still images to field dependent versus field independent learners.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartfinaldissertation.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectnon-motion related learning tasksen_US
dc.subjectmotion-related learning tasksen_US
dc.subjectChinese charactersen_US
dc.subjectanimated imagesen_US
dc.subjectstill imagesen_US
dc.subjectcognitive styleen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Still Images and Animated Images on Motion-Related and Non-Motion Related Learning Tasks in College Students of Different Levels of Field Dependenceen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTeaching and Learningen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBurton, John K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoore, David Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLockee, Barbara B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPotter, Kenneth R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoolittle, Peter E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04222005-182413/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-04-22en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-04-26
dc.date.adate2005-04-26en_US


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