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dc.contributor.authorFournier, Angela Kromen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:10:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:10:48Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-21en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04252005-143231en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/27271
dc.description.abstractThis quasi-experimental field study tested the psychosocial effects of a forensic human-animal interaction (HAI) program on prison inmates. The study assessed the impact of the HAI program using both between-subject and within-subject methods and analyses. A total of 54 male inmates participated in the research by completing self-report measures, keeping journals, and allowing researchers access to their institutional files. In general, it was hypothesized the HAI program would result in positive psychosocial outcomes for inmates. Dependent measures included inmate self-reported treatment level within the prisonâ s therapeutic community, frequency of institutional infractions, and scores from self-report measures assessing social skills, inmate perception of the prison environment, optimism, mood disturbance, and HAI. Between-subject analyses compared a sample of the participants (n = 48) in a pretest-posttest repeated-measures design, comparing a Treatment group of participants in the HAI program with a Control group of participants on the waiting list for the program. Results indicated that the HAI program was associated with increased treatment progress in the therapeutic community, improvement or maintenance of social sensitivity, and improved scores on a measure of transient depressed mood. Hypotheses regarding institutional infractions, perceptions of the prison environment, and optimism were not supported. The within-subject portion of the research consisted of evaluating the relationship between daily HAI and mood with a smaller group of participants (n = 6) who completed journals in a single-subject repeated-measures fashion. Results suggested mood was differentially related to HAI for Treatment and Control group participants. Findings are discussed in relation to proximal versus distal outcomes of HAI and suggestions are made for future research.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartetd2_angela_fournier_phd.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectanimal-assisted therapyen_US
dc.subjecthuman-animal interactionen_US
dc.titleAn Investigation of the Psychosocial Impact of Human-Animal Interaction on a Forensic Populationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairGeller, E. Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Lee D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWinett, Richard A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSuthers-McCabe, H. Marieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFinney, Jack W.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04252005-143231/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-04-25en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-04-27
dc.date.adate2005-04-27en_US


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