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dc.contributor.authorMännikkö, Nancy Farmen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:12:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:12:28Z
dc.date.issued1997-10-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05222007-091438en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/27847
dc.description.abstractScholars in the history and sociology of engineering in the United States have commented critically on the unwillingness of twentieth century engineers to participate actively in politics. Alfred Chandler, for example, has noted the absence of engineers in Progressive Era reform movements, while Edwin T. Layton Jr has criticized engineers in the 1920s for an excessive focus on sterile status seeking. This perceived lack of twentieth century engineering activism is especially puzzling given that nineteenth-century American engineers and engineering societies did not hesitate to lobby openly for clean water, smoke abatement, municipal reform, and numerous other issues.en_US
dc.format.mediumBTDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLD5655.V856_1997.M366.pdfen_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectGilded Ageen_US
dc.subjectvoluntary associationsen_US
dc.subjectProfessionalismen_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V856 1997.M366en_US
dc.titleBrothers professionally and socially: the rise of local engineering clubs during the Gilded Ageen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHirsh, Richard F.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05222007-091438/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-05-22en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-05-22
dc.date.adate2007-05-22en_US


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