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dc.contributor.authorRolling, August Jamesonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:13:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:13:25Z
dc.date.issued2007-06-07en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06212007-161239en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/28093
dc.description.abstractThis research produced a new class of skin friction gages that measures wall shear even in shock environments. One test specimen separately measured wall shear and variable-pressure induced moment. Through the investigation of available computational modeling methods, techniques for accurately predicting gage physical responses were developed. The culmination of these model combinations was a design optimization procedure. This procedure was applied to three disparate test conditions: 1) short-duration, high-enthalpy testing, 2) blow-down testing, and 3) flight testing. The resulting optimized gage designs were virtually tested against each set of nominal load conditions. The finalized designs each successfully met their respective test condition constraints while maximizing strain output due to wall shear. These gages limit sources of apparent strain: inertia, temperature gradient, and uniform pressure. A unique use of bellows provided a protective shroud for surface strain gages. Oil fill provided thermal and dynamic damping while eliminating uniform pressure as a source of output voltage. Two Wheatstone bridge configurations were developed to minimize temperature effects first from temperature gradient and then from spatially varying heat flux induced gradient. An inertia limiting technique was developed that parametrically investigated mass and center of gravity impact on strain output. Multiple disciplinary computational simulations of thermal, dynamic, shear, moment, inertia, and instrumentation interaction were developed. Examinations of instrumentation error, settling time, filtering, multiple input dynamic response, and strain gage placement to avoid thermal gradient were conducted. Detailed mechanical drawings for several gages were produced for fabrication and future testing.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartRollingVT2007July3.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectwall shearen_US
dc.subjectshock impingementen_US
dc.subjectcomplex turbulent flowen_US
dc.subjectskin frictionen_US
dc.titleDesign of Gages for Direct Skin Friction Measurements in Complex Turbulent Flows with Shock Impingement Compensationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAerospace and Ocean Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSchetz, Joseph A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoyer, Keith M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHallauer, William L. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMacLean, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKapania, Rakesh K.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06212007-161239/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-06-21en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-07-05
dc.date.adate2007-07-05en_US


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