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dc.contributor.authorDaugherty, Susan AtLeeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:16:26Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:16:26Z
dc.date.issued2005-09-14en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-09192005-214943en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29025
dc.description.abstractPain is a complex, ubiquitous phenomenon that can be debilitating and costly. Although it is well known that some individuals can easily tolerate pain while others are more intolerant to pain, little is known of the neurophysiological bases of these differences. Because differences in sensory information processing may underlie variability in tolerance to pain and because measures of sensory gating are used to explore differences in sensory information processing, sensory gating among college students (N = 14) who are tolerant or intolerant to pain was investigated. This investigation explored the hypothesis that those who were more tolerant to pain would evidence greater sensory gating. Pain tolerance was first determined using a cold pressor task. Sensory gating was then determined by the amount of attenuation of the amplitude of a second painful, electrical, somatosensory stimulus (S2) in relation to the amplitude of an identical first stimulus (S1) in a paired-stimulus evoked potential (EP ) paradigm. The results obtained showed the intolerant group exhibiting greater physiological reactivity than the tolerant group, indicating that the tolerant group attained greater sensory gating than the intolerant group.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartsusandaughertydissertation.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectFrontal Lobesen_US
dc.subjectSEPen_US
dc.subjectPain Toleranceen_US
dc.subjectPaired Stimulusen_US
dc.subjectSensory Gatingen_US
dc.titleNeurophysiological Differences in Pain Reactivity: Why Some People are Tolerant to Painen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarrison, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenbow, Donald Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-09192005-214943/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairBell, Martha Annen_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairHorton, James E.en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-09-19en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-10-11
dc.date.adate2005-10-11en_US


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