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dc.contributor.authorMorris, Jeffery Thomasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:17:05Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:17:05Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-01en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-10042010-225927en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29195
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I explore discourse around the environmental risks of nanotechnology, and through this study of nanotechnology make the case that the dominance in risk discourse of regulatory science is limiting policy debate on environmental risks, and that specific initiatives should be undertaken to broaden debate not just on nanotechnology, but generally on the risks of new technologies. I argue that the treatment of environmental risk in public policy debates has failed for industrial chemicals, is failing for nanotechnology, and most certainly will fail for synthetic biology and other new technologies unless we change how we describe the impacts to people and other living things from the development and deployment of technology. However, I also contend that the nanotechnology case provides reason for optimism that risk can be given different, and better, treatment in environmental policy debates. I propose specific policy initiatives to advance a richer discourse around the environmental implications of emerging technologies. Evidence of enriched environmental policy debates would be a decentering of language concerning risk by developing within discourse language and practice directed toward enriching the human and environmental condition.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartMorris_JT_D_2010_v2.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectchemical regimeen_US
dc.subjectnanomaterialen_US
dc.subjectstory lineen_US
dc.subjectdiscourse analysisen_US
dc.titleRisk, Language, and Power: The Nanotechnology Environmental Policy Caseen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairAllen, Barbara L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHull, Robert Bruce IVen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPatzig, Eileen Cristen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHalfon, Saul E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-10042010-225927/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-10-04en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-11-10
dc.date.adate2010-11-10en_US


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