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dc.contributor.authorFelder, Monique Thereseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:17:17Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:17:17Z
dc.date.issued2006-09-11en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-10112006-085209en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29242
dc.description.abstractThe academic performance of African-American, Hispanic and low-income students is an ongoing national problem, as these students are not making the same academic gains as their White, Asian, and more socio-economically privileged peers. Schools across the country are striving to close this achievement gap, especially in light of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002 (more commonly known as the No Child Left Behind Act), which states as its main objective "to close the achievement gap with accountability, flexibility and choices so that no child is left behind" (Public Law 107-110, 107th Congress, 2002). Research on effective schools shows that schools can positively impact student achievement--especially the achievement of minority and poor students (Andrews & Sonder, 1987; Edmonds, 1981). Moreover, research shows that very few elements account for more inconsistency in student achievement than school leadership (Leithwood, 1994). Principals' behaviors and practices impact student achievement (Edsource et al., 2005; Powell, 2004; Waters, Marzano & McNulty, 2003). Hence, the purpose of this study was to use Powell's (2004) five domains of effective principal leadership behaviors and practices (e.g., vision, mission and culture; curriculum and classroom instruction; collaboration and shared leadership; family and community involvement; and effective management) as a lens to identify, compare and contrast, from the perspective of teachers, the leadership behaviors and practices of principals in predominantly minority elementary schools deemed effective and principals in predominantly minority elementary schools deemed marginally effective. The sample consisted of 20 schools (e.g., 10 effective and 10 marginally effective) in a mid-Atlantic state. Data were collected using a 76-item survey questionnaire developed by Powell (2004).en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartFelderDissertation.pdfen_US
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectprincipal practicesen_US
dc.subjectprincipal behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectachievement gapen_US
dc.subjectleadershipen_US
dc.subjectprincipalsen_US
dc.subjectadministratorsen_US
dc.subjecteffective schoolsen_US
dc.subjectinstructional leadershipen_US
dc.subjectstudent achievementen_US
dc.titleLeadership Behaviors and Practices of Principals in Predominantly Minority Elementary Schoolsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairTwiford, Travis W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberByers, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Gilbert R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMallory, Walter D.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-10112006-085209/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-10-11en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-05-10
dc.date.adate2007-05-10en_US


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