Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Jada E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:19:11Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:19:11Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-10en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-11242011-100412en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29735
dc.description.abstractAcademic persistence among African American college students has become an important issue due to the consistent lack of increase in the retention rates of these students. Despite the importance of this issue in the field of education, little has been done to study how family factors may influence college studentâ s academic success from a family science perspective. Further, students attending HBCUs are rarely utilized in empirical research even though HBCUs have proven to be effective in graduating African American students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which African American college studentsâ perceive family relationships and support as impacting their academic persistence. Fourteen African American college students attending an HBCU were interviewed about their perceptions of the impact of family relationships and support on their academic persistence. Participants included nine females and five males all identifying as juniors or seniors. Findings for the study included four major themes: (a) family structure and family relationships, (b) challenges/overcoming obstacles, (c) coping strategies, and (d) success and perseverance. Family structure and relationships were defined in a variety of ways by participants, which included immediate family, non-kin, and extended family. Participants faced several challenges and obstacles including transitioning to college, family issues at home, and being a burden, particularly financially, on other family members. Several coping strategies were utilized by participants. Family support, religiosity, peer relationships, and music were cited most often by participants in this study. The study concluded that family relationships and support are indeed important in academic persistence of African American college students.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBrooks_JE_D_2011.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectAcademic Persistenceen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American Familiesen_US
dc.subjectCollege Studentsen_US
dc.title"We're in this together" : Family Factors Contributing to the Academic Persistence of African American College Students attending an HBCUen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairAllen, Katherine R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFew-Demo, April L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeszaros, Peggy S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBenson, Mark J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-11242011-100412/en_US
dc.date.sdate2011-11-24en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-01-05
dc.date.adate2012-01-05en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record