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dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Benjamin Farleyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:19:14Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:19:14Z
dc.date.issued2007-11-16en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-11262007-142211en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29748
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents the results of a detailed physical and hydrogeophysical study of two soil-filled sinkholes mantled by ancient New River fluvial terrace deposits. Research was performed at the Virginia Tech Kentland Experimental Farms in Whitethorne, Virginia, USA between fall 2003 and spring 2007, and focused on characterizing infiltration, deep drainage, and recharge through soil-filled sinkholes. Using hydrogeophysical methods, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture was modeled and potential recharge was quantified in two soil-filled sinkholes. Access-tube time domain reflectometry (TDR) was used to derive one-dimensional (1-D) soil moisture profiles. During access-tube installation, 470 soil samples were obtained from depths between 0.3 and to 9.0 m and characterized both physically and chemically. Using these data, a TDR calibration method was developed. Physio-chemical, TDR moisture, and 1-D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data were used to derive a numerically optimized form of Archieâ s Law which was used to convert ERT measurements into volumetric soil moisture. These results led to development of 2-D ERT-derived distributions of soil moisture in three transects across the two sinkholes in two terraces. Potential recharge was quantified using time-series ERT data with comparison to modeled cumulative potential evapotranspiration (PET) and cumulative precipitation between May 17 and October 9, 2006. The patterns of ERT-derived potential recharge values compared well with those expected from PET and precipitation data. Over the monitoring period from late spring to early fall during this study, results showed that a period of intense rain followed by a 31-day period of consistent rain, in which the rate of precipitation was equal to or exceeded PET, were the only periods in which significant amounts of potential recharge occurred (from 19 to 31% of cumulative precipitation during the study). Spatial distributions of ERT-derived moisture clearly revealed that significant amounts of infiltration occurred on sinkhole flanks and bottoms. Runoff during periods of intense rain flowed to the topographically lowest point in the sinkholes where it infiltrated and resulted in localized zones of enhanced infiltration and potential recharge to the water table.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartPart_2_not_ok_to_distribute.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartPart_3_ok_to_distribute.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartDissertation_Final.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartPart_1_ok_to_distribute.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectmantled karsten_US
dc.subjectdeep drainageen_US
dc.subjectpotential rechargeen_US
dc.subjectkarst hydrologyen_US
dc.subjectconcentrated rechargeen_US
dc.subjectdiffuse rechargeen_US
dc.titleHydrogeophysical quantification of infiltration and recharge through soil-filled sinkholes using Time Domain Reflectometry and Electrical Resistivity Tomographyen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSchreiber, Madeline E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurbey, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniels, Walter Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRimstidt, james Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, William B.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-11262007-142211/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-11-26en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-11-28
dc.date.adate2007-11-28en_US


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