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dc.contributor.authorDurgin, Gregory Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:19:31Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:19:31Z
dc.date.issued2000-11-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-12012000-191046en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29843
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation outlines work accomplished in the pursuit of this degree. This report is also designed to be a general introduction to the concepts and techniques of small-scale radio channel modeling. At the present time, there does not exist a comprehensive introduction and overview of basic concepts in this field. Furthermore, as the wireless industry continues to mature and develop technology, the need is now greater than ever for more sophisticated channel modeling research. Each chapter of this preliminary report is, in itself, a stand-alone topic in channel modeling theory. Culled from original reports and journal papers, each chapter makes a unique contribution to the field of channel modeling. Original contributions in this report include: 1. joint characterization of time-varying, space-varying, and frequency-varying channels under the rubric of duality 2. rules and definitions for constructing channel models that solve Maxwell's equations 3. overview of probability density functions that describe random small-scale fading 4. techniques for modeling a small-scale radio channel using an angle spectrum 5. overview of techniques for describing fading statistics in wireless channels 6. results from a wideband spatio-temporal measurement campaign Together, the chapters provide a cohesive overview of basic principles. The discussion of the wideband spatio-temporal measurement campaign at 1920 MHz makes an excellent case study in applied channel modeling and ties together much of the theory developed in this dissertation.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartetd3.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectMobile Radio Propagationen_US
dc.subjectFadingen_US
dc.subjectWireless Communicationsen_US
dc.titleTheory of Stochastic Local Area Channel Modeling for Wireless Communicationsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRappaport, Theodore S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoyle, Robert J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Jeffrey Hughen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Gary S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKohler, Werner E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberde Wolf, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-12012000-191046/en_US
dc.date.sdate2000-12-01en_US
dc.date.rdate2001-12-11
dc.date.adate2000-12-11en_US


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