Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGroesbeck, Richard Leeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:19:55Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:19:55Z
dc.date.issued2001-11-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-12072001-151608en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/29969
dc.description.abstractThis research studies the effects of group stewardship and group learning on permanent work groups performing the core work and service processes in their organizations. Stewardship has been proposed as a potentially significant form of intrinsic motivation that causes people to act collectively in the best interests of their organization's stakeholders. However, stewardship has not been operationalized nor have its antecedents and consequences been empirically tested in prior field research. After defining group stewardship, the construct is shown to be distinct from related concepts such as psychological ownership and identification with the organization. While previous research has studied the concepts of individual and organizational learning, the concept of group learning is just emerging in the group effectiveness literature. Group learning is shown to be a multidimensional concept including integration of external perspectives, within-group collaboration, and practical application through experimentation. Within and between analysis (WABA) is utilized to determine which task, group and organizational constructs relate to the development of group stewardship at the individual, group and organizational levels of analysis. Four constructs, the need for analysis in doing the group's work, group potency, affective trust, and identification with the organization, are shown to be especially significant in developing group stewardship. Additionally, each of these four factors is shown to support different aspects of group learning. Finally, group stewardship is shown to be highly correlated with the presence of group learning, proactive behaviors, group performance, and employee job satisfaction.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartGroesbeck_dissertation.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectgroup stewardshipen_US
dc.subjectwork group effectivenessen_US
dc.subjectgroup learningen_US
dc.titleAn Empirical Study of Group Stewardship and Learning: Implications for Work Group Effectivenessen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentIndustrial and Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairVVan Aken, Eileen M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKoelling, Charles Patricken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Diane E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTriantis, Konstantinos P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarkham, Steven E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-12072001-151608/en_US
dc.date.sdate2001-12-07en_US
dc.date.rdate2002-12-07
dc.date.adate2001-12-07en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record