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dc.contributor.authorVilleneuve, Pierre V.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:21:26Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:21:26Z
dc.date.issued1996-06-28en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-2047101569611961en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/30336
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this research has been to characterize the sensitivity of the earth's shortwave bidirectional reflectivity distribution function (BRDF) to variations in cloud parameters. The BRDF is a remote sensing tool used to predict the flux reflected from a given earth scene from a satellite-based measurement of the reflected intensity. The BRDF is necessary in order to account for the anisotropic nature of the shortwave radiation field. A shortwave atmospheric radiation Monte-Carlo ray-trace model has been developed as part of this research to predict the earth-reflected radiation field at the top of the atmosphere. This model was developed while paying special attention to clouds including realistic three-dimensional cloud fields characterized by fundamental physical properties. This model was used to predict the BRDF for various cloud fields where a single cloud parameter was varied as part of the sensitivity analysis. The results show that the shortwave BRDF is very sensitive to changes in cloud vertical thickness and mean cloud size. This sensitivity is also strongly dependent on the direction from which the scene is observed. In a related analysis, a study was done of the error associated with using a BRDF from one scene to retrieve fluxes from a second scene. The model was also used to predict images of cloud fields for comparison with experimental data from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratories satellite-based Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR). Finally the output from the radiation model was integrated with the end-to-end radiative electrothermal model of a practical earth radiation budget instrument. This integrated model was used to predict the instrument response to scanning a realistic partly-cloudy earth scene.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartetd.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartdisser.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectnoneen_US
dc.titleA Numerical Study of the Sensitivity of Cloudy-Scene Bidirectional Reflectivity Distribution Functions to Variations in Cloud Parametersen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMahan, James Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStern, Curtis H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Douglas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott, Elaine P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCampbell, James B. Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-2047101569611961/en_US
dc.date.sdate1998-07-12en_US
dc.date.rdate1996-06-28
dc.date.adate1996-06-28en_US


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