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dc.contributor.authorChalla, Siva Prasadarao Jr.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:21:30Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:21:30Z
dc.date.issued1998-01-26en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-2298-155032en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/30354
dc.description.abstractMost common object models of distributed object systems have a limited set of object-oriented features, lacking the advanced features of `polymorphism' (an abstraction mechanism that represents a quality or state of being able to assume different forms) and `concurrency' (the ability to have more than one thread of execution in an object simultaneously). The lack of support for advanced features is a serious limitation because it restricts the development of new components and limits reuse of existing of components that use these advanced features. As a result, wrappers must be used that hide the advanced features or components must be re-implemented using only the features of the common object model. In this dissertation, a new direction of research centered on a subset of object-oriented languages, specifically statically typed languages, is considered. One of the major drawbacks of existing distributed object systems is that they cater to a broad domain of programming languages including both object-oriented as well as non object-oriented languages. Mapping an object model into a non object-oriented language is a complex task and it does not appear natural to a native language user. The interoperable common object model (ICOM) proposed in this dissertation is an attempt to elevate common object models (with the advanced features of polymorphism and concurrency) closer to the object models of statically typed object-oriented languages. Specific features of the ICOM object model include: remote inheritance, method overloading, parameterized types, and guard methods. The actor model and reflection techniques are used to develop a uniform implementation framework for the ICOM object model in C++ and Modula-3. Prototype applications were implemented to demonstrate the utility of the advanced features of the ICOM object model. The main contributions of this dissertation are: design and implementation of a powerful common object model, an architecture for distributed compilation, and an implementation of a distributed object model using the actor model.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartdiss.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectinteroperabilityen_US
dc.subjectdistributed object modelsen_US
dc.subjectdistributed object-oriented programmingen_US
dc.subjectobject-oriented programmingen_US
dc.subjectdistributed Act++en_US
dc.subjectcommon object modelsen_US
dc.titleImproving Polymorphism and Concurrency in Common Object Modelsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKafura, Dennis G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMidkiff, Scott F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeath, Lenwood S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAbrams, Marcen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArthur, James D.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-2298-155032/en_US
dc.date.sdate1998-01-26en_US
dc.date.rdate1999-03-03
dc.date.adate1998-03-03en_US


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