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dc.contributor.authorRaven, Hans Rafaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:30:16Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2004-05-06en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-01072006-154907en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/30847
dc.description.abstractThe study of the flow of a fan blade was conducted to improve tonal fan noise reduction by optimizing an existing flow control configuration. The current configuration consisted of a trailing edge Slot with a flow control area of 0.045 in² per inch span with an exit angle of -3.3° with respect to the blade exit angle. Two other flow control configurations containing discrete jets were investigated. For the first configuration, the trailing edge jets (TEJ), the fan blade was modified with discrete jets spaced 0.3 inches apart with a flow control area of 0.01 in² per inch span positioned on the trailing edge aimed at -3.3° with respect to the blade exit angle. Similarly, discrete jets were also placed on the suction surface at 95.5% chord aimed at 15° with respect to the local blade surface. This configuration is referred to as the suction surface jet (SSJ). The discrete jets for both configurations were designed to be choked while injecting a mass flow rate of 1.00% of the fan through-flow. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to model new configurations and study subsequent changes in total pressure deficit using a blade design inlet Mach number of 0.73, Reynolds number based on chord length of 1.67 à 106, and design incidence angle of 0°. Experimental testing was later conducted in a 2D cascade tunnel. The TEJ and SSJ were tested at design blowing of 1.00% and at off-design conditions of 0.50%, 0.75%, and 1.25% fan through-flow. Results between the different flow control configurations were compared using a blowing coefficient. CFD showed the TEJ and SSJ offered aerodynamic improvement over the Slot configuration. Testing showed the SSJ outperformed the TEJ, as validated in CFD, producing wider and shallower wakes. SSJ area-averaged pressure losses were 25% less than TEJ at design. Noise predictions based on CFD findings showed that both TEJ and SSJ provided additional tonal sound power level attenuation over the Slot configuration at similar blowing coefficients, with the SSJ providing the most attenuation. Noise prediction based on experimental results concurred that the SSJ provided more total attenuation than the TEJ. Experimental results showed that the SSJ performed better aerodynamically and, based on analytical prediction, provided 2 dB more total attenuation than the TEJ.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartHans_Raven_Thesis_Final.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectFanen_US
dc.subjectComputational Fluid Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectCFDen_US
dc.subjectFan Noise Reductionen_US
dc.subjectCascade Testingen_US
dc.subjectFlow Controlen_US
dc.subjectWake Managementen_US
dc.subjectTrailing Edge Blowingen_US
dc.subjectSuction Surface Blowingen_US
dc.subjectAerodynamic Lossen_US
dc.titleFlow Control Optimization for Improvement of Fan Noise Reductionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNg, Wing Faien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDancey, Clinton L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurdisso, Ricardo A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-01072006-154907/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-01-07en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-04-04
dc.date.adate2006-04-04en_US


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