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dc.contributor.authorNelson, Jr., Michael A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:31:36Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:31:36Z
dc.date.issued2006-02-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-02072006-200108en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31165
dc.description.abstract

The events of 9-11 caused the US military to deploy across the globe in support of the Global War on Terror (GWoT) with the assurance it would receive the resources needed to fulfill those operations. As a subordinate arm of the government, the US military is entrusted to prosecute the policies of its civilian leadership provided they receive the required resources to do so. As this thesis demonstrates however, the military is struggling to reconcile how to deliver the goals of its civilian administration when it simultaneously fails to receive the resources needed to meet their demands.

The Department of Defense (DoD) is experiencing a stark increase in its deployments and combat operations. Unprecedented 'peacetime' use of Reserve and Guard forces and remarkable DoD personnel policies have stretched the military thin. Despite substantial military budget increases, the military fails to receive adequate funding for combat operations. Meanwhile, soldiers fail to receive the appropriate equipment needed to fight the emerging threats of the GWoT. The military continues to thin many of its own operations, increase the stress on its members, and over-work its equipment in order to meet the needs of its civilian government.

Three solutions exist: maintain the status quo, reduce the scope of the GWoT, or begin military funding on par with past wartime budgets. The status quo produced an overstretched/underfunded military. Threats to US security can not support a reduced GWoT. Therefore, the US should increase DoD end strength, increase GWoT funding, and accelerate weapons research and procurement.

en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectUS Militaryen_US
dc.subjectCivil-Military Relationsen_US
dc.subjectGlobal War on Terroren_US
dc.titleOverstretched and Underfunded: The Status of the US Military in the GWoTen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Scott C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-02072006-200108/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairPourchot, Georgeta Valentinaen_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairLuke, Timothy W.en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-02-07en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-02-16
dc.date.adate2006-02-16en_US


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