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dc.contributor.authorCullifer, Julie Dianaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:31:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:31:42Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-29en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-02102009-141655en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31202
dc.description.abstractThe continued commitment to and assertion of the primacy of the sovereign state within international relations theory has resulted in a discourse which theorizes and examines only those issues and conflicts of international politics which can be made to fit neatly within the prism of the neorealist discourse. As such, there exists a void in the examination of such issues as the nature and possibilities of alternative forms of political community, or into the political and economic effects these alternative forms of political community (such as social, economic, religious and environmental) pose to the traditional state and the envisioning of a global society. The aim of this thesis is two-fold: first, to renew interest and inquiry into the discursive limitations of the neorealist discourse of difference and negation; and secondly, to call attention to how the practical and discursive constraints of the neorealist conception of the state as political community effects the ability of international relations theory to address current conflicts and issues on the international stage. The intent of this analysis is to spark a renewed interest in exploring not only the emergence of new forms of political community but the possibility of being able to speak about these new forms within a discourse of international relations. Only through a commitment to the critical examination of its discourse can international relations theory uncover new ways to re-envision such concepts as political community and international politics.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartCulliferThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectsovereign stateen_US
dc.subjectpolitical communityen_US
dc.subjectpost-structuralismen_US
dc.subjectneorealismen_US
dc.titleThe Sovereign State as Political Community: A Revisiting of the Post-Structuralist Critique of the Neorealist Stateen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNelson, Scott C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLuke, Timothy W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStivachtis, Ioannis Yannisen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-02102009-141655/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-02-10en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-03-04
dc.date.adate2009-03-04en_US


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