Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMerchant, Fariden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:32:04Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:32:04Z
dc.date.issued2007-02-05en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-02222007-110205en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31313
dc.description.abstractEvery year three million deaths are attributed to malaria, of which one-third are of children. Malaria is a vector-borne disease, where a mosquito acts as the vector that transmits the disease. In the last few years, computer simulation based models have been used effectively to study the vector population dynamics and control strategies of vector-borne diseases. Typically, these models use ordinary differential equations to simulate the spread of malaria. Although these models provide a powerful mechanism to study the spread of malaria, they have several shortcomings. The research in this thesis focuses on creating a simulation model based on the framework of cellular automata, which addresses many shortcomings of previous models. Cellular automata are dynamical systems, which are discrete in time and space. The implementation of the model proposed can easily be integrated with EpiSims/TRANSIMS. EpiSims is an epidemiological modeling tool for studying the spread of infectious diseases; it uses social contact network from TRANSIMS (A Transport Analysis and Simulation System). Simulation results from the prototype implementation showed qualitatively correct results for vector densities, diffusion and epidemiological curves.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartFarid_Thesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectVector-borne diseaseen_US
dc.subjectMalariaen_US
dc.subjectCellular Automataen_US
dc.subjectSimulationen_US
dc.titleSIMULATING THE SPREAD OF MALARIA: A CELLULAR AUTOMATON BASED MATHEMATICAL MODEL & A PROTOTYPE SOFTWARE IMPLEMENTATIONen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMarathe, Madhav V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarrett, Christopher L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLaubenbacher, Reinhard C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-02222007-110205/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairMortveit, Henning S.en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-02-22en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-03-19
dc.date.adate2007-03-19en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record