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dc.contributor.authorSparacio, Matthew Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:32:46Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:32:46Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-16en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-03202010-123211en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31513
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the role of emotions â specifically fear â in the development and early stages of settlement at Jamestown. More so than any other factor, the Protestant belief system transplanted by the first settlers to Virginia helps explain the hardships the English encountered in the New World, as well as influencing English perceptions of self and other. Out of this transplanted Protestantism emerged a discourse of fear that revolved around the agency of the Devil in the temporal world. Reformed beliefs of the Devil identified domestic English Catholics and English imperial rivals from Iberia as agents of the diabolical. These fears travelled to Virginia, where the English quickly Ê»satanizedʼ another group, the Virginia Algonquians, based upon misperceptions of native religious and cultural practices. I argue that English belief in the diabolic nature of the Native Americans played a significant role during the â starving timeâ winter of 1609-1610. In addition to the acknowledged agency of the Devil, Reformed belief recognized the existence of providential actions based upon continued adherence to the Englishʼs nationally perceived covenant with the Almighty. Efforts to maintain Godʼs favor resulted in a reformation of manners jump-started by Sir Thomas Daleʼs Lawes Divine, Morall and Martiall, and English tribulations in Virginia â such as Opechancanoughʼs 1622 attack upon the settlement â served as concrete evidence of Godʼs displeasure to English observers. A religiously infused discourse of fear shaped the first two decades of the Jamestown settlement.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSparacio_MJ_T_2010_f1.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectEarly Modern England; Colonial Virginia; Jamestownen_US
dc.titleThe Devil in Virginia: Fear in Colonial Jamestown, 1607-1622en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairShifflett, Crandall A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEkirch, A. Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShadle, Brett L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-03202010-123211/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-03-20en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-04-06
dc.date.adate2010-04-06en_US


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