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dc.contributor.authorMcFarren, Matthew Alanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:32:53Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:32:53Z
dc.date.issued2007-03-22en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-03262007-133243en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31548
dc.description.abstractRobert Agnew proposed a new version of strain theory in 1992. In this article, Agnew argued that strain is not only a result of the blocked opportunity to achieve goals as Merton had argued, but that strain also results from the removal of positively valued stimuli and the presence of negative stimuli. With such a theory, criminologist had focused on how this may explain juvenile delinquency. Yet very little attention was given to how this may affect adult criminality as well. Similarly, Hirschi (1969) presented social control theory as a means of describing the causes of juvenile delinquency. While these theories have been repeatedly tested and supported with respect to delinquency, they have rarely been used to describe adult criminality. This paper intends to compare the utility of Agnewâ s general strain theory and Hirschiâ s control theory in explaining the criminal behavior of fathers. For general strain theory, it is predicted that fathers who have either high contact and low relationship quality or who have low contact and high relationship quality will have significantly higher criminal activity than those who have high contact and relationship quality or low contact and relationship quality. Conversely, social control theory predicts that fathers who have low relationship qualities with their children are more likely to commit criminal acts. This paper aims to ascertain which of these hypotheses is more accurate.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartMattThesis.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartIRBApproval.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectCrimeen_US
dc.subjectAttachmenten_US
dc.subjectGeneral Strain Theoryen_US
dc.subjectControl Theoryen_US
dc.titleThe Relationship between Involvement, Strain, and the Criminality of Fathers of At-Risk Childrenen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHawdon, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYuan, Anastasia Sue Vogten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShoemaker, Donald J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-03262007-133243/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-03-26en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-04-10
dc.date.adate2007-04-10en_US


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