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dc.contributor.authorSink, Carolyn A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:33:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:33:07Z
dc.date.issued2002-03-25en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04042002-070623en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31620
dc.description.abstractThis study monitored the storage lesion of 15 units of canine platelet concentrates harvested by differential centrifugation. Canine platelet concentrates were stored at 20-24° C in a platelet rotator for a total of 9 days; the storage lesion of three second generation platelet storage containers was compared. The battery of in vitro tests used to monitor the storage lesion were selected from previous studies performed with human platelet concentrates separated by differential centrifugation. Based on these tests, canine platelet concentrates exhibited a storage lesion similar to human platelet concentrates. Metabolic analytes demonstrated decreasing pH, carbon dioxide, bicarbonate and glucose concentrations concurrent with increasing oxygen and lactate dehydrogenase activity over the 9-day period. Platelet structural changes were monitored by mean platelet volume, which began to increase on Day-5. Platelet function appeared to be compromised, as indicated by aggregation studies using collagen and adenosine diphosphate as agonists. Product sterility was maintained. There was no consensus of data supporting superior performance of one platelet storage container. This study indicates that canine platelet concentrates may be harvested by differential centrifugation of whole blood. In vitro studies utilizing three second-generation platelet storage bags support a previous study and concurs that canine platelet concentrates stored at 20-24° C using continuous agitation are viable for at least 5 days.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSinkMT.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectcanine platelet concentrateen_US
dc.subjectstorage lesionen_US
dc.subjectblood componenten_US
dc.titleCanine Platelet Concentrates: An In Vitro Study to Effectively Provide a Source of Functional Plateletsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFeldman, Bernard F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMonroe, William Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPanciera, David L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04042002-070623/en_US
dc.date.sdate2002-04-04en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-04-04
dc.date.adate2002-04-04en_US


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