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dc.contributor.authorChon, Dong Hyunen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:33:16Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:33:16Z
dc.date.issued2005-03-30en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04082005-002447en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31658
dc.description.abstractIn order to study the performance and mechanisms of excess sludge reduction in the activated sludge that incorporates the Cannibal™ Process, laboratory activated sludge systems incorporating an anaerobic bioreactor into the sludge recycle stream were operated. In this study, the solids production in the Cannibal system was about 35-40% of the conventional system under steady state conditions. The reduction in waste sludge was optimized when the interchange rate, (the ratio of sludge fed from the activated sludge system to the bioreactor compared to the total mass in the activated sludge system) was set at about 10%. It was found that the release of protein from the anaerobic bioreactor was greater than that from the aerobic bioreactor. The SOUR data suggested that the released protein from the anaerobic bioreactor was easily degraded when the sludge was returned to the activated sludge system. It was also found that when the proportion of sludge added to the anaerobic bioreactor in batch tests was approximately 10%, the protein release was about 30 mg/L. When the proportion of sludge added was increased to 26 to 41%, the release was reduced to 10 and 6 mg/L, respectively. Within 30 hours, the protein release was complete. This suggests that there is an optimum or maximum amount of recycle or interchange (~10%) for the process to function best.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesisCannibalProcess.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpolysaccharideen_US
dc.subjectSludge productionen_US
dc.subjectActivated sludgeen_US
dc.subjectAnaerobic digestionen_US
dc.subjectAerobic digestionen_US
dc.subjectproteinen_US
dc.subjectvolatile solids destructionen_US
dc.titlePerformance and Mechanisms of Excess Sludge Reduction in the Cannibal™ Processen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Planningen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNovak, John T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoardman, Gregory D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRandall, Clifford W.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04082005-002447/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-04-08en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-06-22
dc.date.adate2005-04-08en_US


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