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dc.contributor.authorNewman, Lindsey M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:33:18Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:33:18Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04092009-110353en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31667
dc.description.abstractThis project analyzes the role of religion, both institutional and private, in Virginiaâ s dealings with witchcraft during the seventeenth century. The witch trials of New England and Europe during the 1600s have tended to overshadow those that simultaneously took place in Virginia, leaving historians to prematurely regard Virginia as an anomaly of rationality in an otherwise superstitious period of witches and demons. Virginiaâ s failure to prosecute those accused of witchcraft was not due to a lack of allegations, my thesis will argue, but can instead be partly attributed to the nature of the colonyâ s religious experience and the theology and practices of Virginiaâ s Anglican Church. While Virginiaâ s seventeenth-century inhabitants migrated to the New World with firmly entrenched English religious values, their relationship with God and their response to the supernatural world were profoundly influenced by New World experiences and peoples. To protect the social fragility of their colony, Virginiaâ s political and religious leaders consciously chose to prosecute offenses that they felt threatened the social cohesion of the colony, such as fornication, gossip, and slander, and dismissed those, such as witchcraft, that threatened to tear it apart.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLMNewmanThesis1.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectVirginiaâ Religious Life and Customsen_US
dc.subjectVirginiaâ Religionâ Seventeenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectVirginiaâ Church Historyâ Seventeenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectChurch of Englandâ Virginiaâ Historyâ Seventeenen_US
dc.subjectWitchcraftâ Virginiaâ Historyâ Seventeenth Centen_US
dc.title"Under an Ill Tongue": Witchcraft and Religion in Seventeenth-Century Virginiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairShifflett, Crandall A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShadle, Brett L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStoudt, Debra L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04092009-110353/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-04-09en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-05-11
dc.date.adate2009-05-11en_US


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