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dc.contributor.authorBrandon, Alison Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:33:22Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:33:22Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-10en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04122007-213238en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31691
dc.description.abstractFace to Face: Does Residence Hall Design Make a Difference in Student Interaction? (Abstract) Student persistence has long been valued by higher education administrators (Glynn, Sauer, & Miller, 2003). Persistence rates are significantly impacted by student interaction (Tinto, 1975). The environment can have a major influence on how students interact with one another (Lewin, 1936). One way in which the environment can influence interactions is by a building design (Strange & Banning, 2001), including residence hall building design. Despite theories that building design impacts interactions, there is little research that explores how student interaction is influenced as a result of residence hall building design. The purpose of this study was to understand how residence hall spaces that differ by architectural style impact college student interactions. Specifically, this study examined the interactions that took place among residents in traditional and suite style residence halls. For purposes of this study, an interaction was defined as face-to-face contact between two or more individuals that was more significant than a simple greeting. The results of the study first revealed that residents of traditional and suite style residence halls have mostly social interactions in their hall. Secondly, the results revealed that students in traditional style residence halls have an easy time meeting other people in their residence hall environment. Lastly, the results showed that students who live in suite style residence halls have a more difficult time meeting other members of their community.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBrandonBackMatter.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartBrandonFrontMatter.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartBrandonBodyMatter.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectinteractionen_US
dc.subjectresidence hallen_US
dc.subjectcollege studentsen_US
dc.subjectdesignen_US
dc.titleFace to Face: Does Residence Hall Design Make a Difference in Student Interaction?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHirt, Joan B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParrott, Kathleen R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSpencer, Edward F. D.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04122007-213238/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-04-12en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-05-22
dc.date.adate2007-05-22en_US


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