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dc.contributor.authorLee, Moira Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:33:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:33:48Z
dc.date.issued2003-04-16en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04182003-113926en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31753
dc.description.abstractThis study tests an aspect of the environmental theory of Peter Huber outlined in his book Hard Green: Saving the Environment from the Environmentalists: A Conservative Manifesto (1999). Huber's thesis is that wealth leads to environmental conservation in two ways: 1) that wealthy nations develop and implement technologies to maximize the efficiency of land use, and 2) that wealthy individuals pour their wealth into the conservation of nature. Using secondary data analysis, I test the first national-level hypothesis with regressions of the variables "Gross National Income" and "ecological footprint," and test the second individual-level hypothesis with logistic regressions of the variables "income" and "donation to environmental groups," from both the General Social Survey and the World Values Survey. The results strongly refute Huber's national-level theory, with evidence that wealthy nations are actually less efficient at using land, but on an individual level the evidence suggests that the wealthy are indeed more likely to donate money to environmental groups.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesisMLee.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectHard Greenen_US
dc.subjectWealthen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmenten_US
dc.subjectAffluenceen_US
dc.titleIs Wealth Green? Examining the Relationship Between Wealth and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFuhrman, Ellsworth R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTurner, Robert G. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHughes, Michael D.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04182003-113926/en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-04-18en_US
dc.date.rdate2004-04-21
dc.date.adate2003-04-21en_US


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