Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMerrell, Thomas Yatesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:33:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:33:48Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-15en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04182005-121744en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31754
dc.description.abstractEver since we were children the phrase â In case of an emergency, walk, DONâ T run, to the nearest exitâ has been drilled into our heads. How to evacuate a large number of people from a given area as quickly and safely as possible has been a question of great importance since the first congregation of man; a question that has yet to be optimally answered. There have been many attempts at finding an answer and many more yet to be made. In light of recent world events, 9/11 for instance, the need for a better answer is apparent. While finding a solution to this problem is the end objective, the goal of this thesis is to develop an application or tool that will aid in the search of an answer to this problem. There are several aspects of traditional evacuation plans that make them inherently suboptimal. First among these is that they are static by nature. When a building is designed, there is some care taken in analyzing its floor plan and finding an optimal evacuation route for everyone. These plans are made under several assumptions and with the obvious constant that they cannot be modified during the actual emergency. Yes, it is possible for such a plan to actually end up being the optimal plan during any given evacuation, but the likelihood of this being the case is most definitely less then 100%. There are many reasons for this. The most obvious is this: the situation that the plan is trying to solve is a very dynamic one. People will not be where they should be or in the quantities that the static plan was prepared for. Many of them will probably not know what they should do in an emergency and so most likely will follow any large group of people, like lemmings. Finally, most situations that require the evacuation of a building or area occur because all or part of the building has become, or is becoming, unsafe. It is impossible for a static evacuation plan to take into account the way a fire or poisonous gas is spreading, or the state of the structural stability of the building. What is needed during a crisis is an artificially intelligent and dynamic evacuation system that is capable of (1) analyzing the state of the building and its occupants, (2) coming up with a plan to get everyone out as fast as possible, and (3) directing all occupants along the best exit routes. Furthermore, the system should be able to modify its plan as the evacuation progresses. This application is intended to provide researchers in this area the means to quickly and accurately simulate different evacuation theories and ideas. That being the case, it will have powerful graphical capabilities, thus allowing the researchers to easily see the real-time results of their work. It will be able to use diverse modeling techniques in order to handle the many different ways of approaching this problem. It will provide a simple way for equations and mathematical models to be entered which can affect the behavior of most aspects of the world being simulated. This work is in conjunction with, and closely tied to, Dr Pushkin Kachrooâ s research on this same topic. The application is designed so that future developers can quickly add to and modify its design to meet their specifications. It is not the goal of this work to provide an application that directly solves the optimal evacuation problem, or one that inherently simulates everything perfectly. It is the job of the researchers using this application to define the specific physics equations and models for each component of the simulation. This application provides an easy way to add these definitions into the simulation calculations. In brief, this Escape Simulator is a client server application. All of the graphics and human interaction are handled client side using Win32 and Direct3D. The actual simulation world calculations are handled server side, and both the client and server communicate via DirectPlay. The algorithm being used to model the objects and world by the server will be completely configurable. In fact, everything in the world, including the world physics, will be completely modifiable. Though the researchers will need to write the necessary pluggins that to define the actual models and algorithms used by the agents, objects, and world, ultimately this will give them much more power and flexibility. It will also allow for third parties to develop libraries of commonly used algorithms and resources that the researchers can use. This research was supported in part from the National Science Foundation through grant no. CMS-0428196 with Dr. S. C. Liu as the Program Director. This support is gratefully acknowledged. Any opinion, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this study are those of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis_Submission_Folder.zipen_US
dc.relation.haspartREADME_For_non-programmers.txten_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis_Thomas_Y_Merrell.PDFen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectdynamically linked library (DLL)en_US
dc.subjectDirectXen_US
dc.subjectWin32en_US
dc.subjectnetworkingen_US
dc.subject3D graphicsen_US
dc.subjectreal-timeen_US
dc.subjectsimulationen_US
dc.titleEscape Simulation Suiteen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKachroo, Pushkinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRavindran, Binoyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSingh, Mahendra P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAbbott, A. Lynnen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04182005-121744/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-04-18en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-04-21
dc.date.adate2005-04-21en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record