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dc.contributor.authorSeay, David Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:34:05Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:34:05Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-15en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04232009-194007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31848
dc.description.abstractEmpire is an emotionally and historically charged term. However, its usage throughout time to describe statesâ and peoplesâ behavior towards others is a display of the vitality in the termâ s etymological construction. Today, the United States must reexamine itself through a historically grounded imperial lens in order to create more beneficial set of policies; by refining its strengths and reforming its weaknesses; both at home and abroad. Presidential leaders and foreign policies, defined by military and ideological power in recent times have both enhanced and bucked a possible imperial American existence. Nonetheless, an imperial assessment of past and future decisions may show Americans their proximity to empire, and may provoke new elements of thought in the American psyche and practices in American politics.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartFinalGraduateThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpolicyen_US
dc.subjectpoweren_US
dc.subjectperceptionen_US
dc.subjectstateen_US
dc.subjectempireen_US
dc.titleCauses and Consequences of an American Empireen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSjoberg, Lauraen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04232009-194007/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairStivachtis, Ioannis Yannisen_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairRothschild, Joyceen_US
dc.date.sdate2009-04-23en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-05-22
dc.date.adate2009-05-22en_US


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