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dc.contributor.authorBertmaring, Ian Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:34:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:34:25Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-13en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04272006-015814en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31967
dc.description.abstractShoulder injuries are a focus of work related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) research due to rising healthcare costs, an aging workforce, and long recovery times. Substantial research has been performed in the area of shoulder WMSDs and a number of risk factors have been implicated in their development; including static loads, repetition, and deviated posture. However, knowledge of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms is limited. Thermography provides a non-invasive technique that may offer clues to unknown physiological markers associated with injury development during job task performance. The objective of this study was to quantify anterior deltoid surface temperature changes as function of changing task demands. Skin surface temperature changes of the anterior deltoid, modified Borg CR-10 ratings, and endurance time during overhead static exertions until exhaustion for two work loads (15 and 30% MVC) and shoulder angles (90o and 115o) were quantified. Ten participants (5 males and 5 females) participated in the study and were free of confounding conditions (such as chronic or acute shoulder injury) and were required to meet body fat percentile requirements. Thermography showed that the higher shoulder angle had a reduced blood flow while there were no differences in temperature for exertion. Modified Borg ratings were not found to be well correlated with temperature values. The findings suggest that workers performing overhead work should minimize their deviated posture when available to prevent a high risk of developing a shoulder WMSD.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis_Ian_Bertmaring.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectmomenten_US
dc.subjectthermographyen_US
dc.subjectisometric contractionen_US
dc.subjectthermal imagingen_US
dc.subjectexertionen_US
dc.titleUsing Thermography to Evaluate the Effects of Arm Flexion and Loading on the Anterior Deltoid during a Simulated Overhead Tasken_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentIndustrial and Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial and Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBabski-Reeves, Kari L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNussbaum, Maury A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott, Elaine P.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04272006-015814/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-04-27en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-06-02
dc.date.adate2006-06-02en_US


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