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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Benjamin Ryanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:34:34Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:34:34Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-22en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04292005-113104en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32024
dc.description.abstractEnergy Harvesting Applications of Ionic Polymers Benjamin R. Martin Abstract The purpose of this thesis is the development and analysis of applications for ionic polymers as energy harvesting devices. The specific need is a self-contained energy harvester to supply renewable power harvested from ambient vibrations to a wireless sensor. Ionic polymers were investigated as mechanical to electrical energy transducers. An ionic polymer device was designed to harvest energy from vibrations and supply power for a wireless structural health monitoring sensor. The ionic polymer energy harvester is tested to ascertain whether the idea is feasible. Transfer functions are constructed for both the open-circuit voltage and the closed-circuit current. The impedance of the device is also quantified. Using the voltage transfer function and the current transfer function it is possible to calculate the power being produced by the device. Power generation is not the only energy harvesting application of ionic polymers, energy storage is another possibility. The ionic polymer device is tested to characterize its charge and discharge capabilities. It is charged with both DC and AC currents. An energy storage comparison is performed between the ionic polymers and capacitors. While the polymers performed well, the electrolytic capacitors are able to store more energy. However, the ionic polymers show potential as capacitors and have the possibility of improved performance as energy storage devices. Current is measured across resistive loads and the supplied power is calculated. Although the power is small, the ionic polymers are able to discharge energy across a load proving that they are capable of supplying power.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartthesis_final_draft.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectEnergy Storageen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Harvestingen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Scavengingen_US
dc.subjectIonic Polymersen_US
dc.titleEnergy Harvesting Applications of Ionic Polymersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairLeo, Donald J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobertshaw, Harry H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInman, Daniel J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04292005-113104/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-04-29en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-05-11
dc.date.adate2005-05-11en_US


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