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dc.contributor.authorEvangelisti, Charles Williamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:09Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:09Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-30en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05052009-110045en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32235
dc.description.abstractBetween 1760 and 1833, English explorers systematically filled in the map of British North America. Many of those explorers worked for two fur-trading companies: the Hudsonâ s Bay Company and the North West Company. In pursuit of new sources of fur, they opened western Canada to European comprehension. Their published accounts of geographic exploration provided the British audience with new geographical information about North America. New geographic information often paved the way for settlement. However, in the case of the Canadian West, increased geographic comprehension did not necessarily lead to settlement. By 1833, the explorers had built a base of knowledge from which the British conceptualized the Canadian wilderness. Over the course of seventy years, the British conception of western Canada remained remarkably consistent. The popular British image of western Canada, persisting into the 1830s, was of a wasteland fit only for the fur trade. The British, who had been expanding around the world for several hundred years, were not yet interested in settlement in western Canada. This thesis seeks to expand upon the link that existed between the fur trade, its employees, and their influence on the British conception of western Canada.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartFinalCorrections.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectHudsonâ s Bay Companyen_US
dc.subjectAlexander Mackenzieen_US
dc.subjectDavid Thompsonen_US
dc.subjectJames Cooken_US
dc.subjectSamuel Hearneen_US
dc.subjectGeorge Vancouveren_US
dc.subjectNorth West Companyen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectFur Tradeen_US
dc.subjectNorth Americaen_US
dc.subjectPeter Ponden_US
dc.subjectAaron Arrowsmithen_US
dc.subjectWestern Explorationen_US
dc.titleTo the Ends of the Earth: A Study of the Explorative Discourse Promoting British Expansionism in Canadaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairThorp, Daniel B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarrow, Mark V. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEkirch, A. Rogeren_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05052009-110045/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-05-05en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-05-29
dc.date.adate2009-05-29en_US


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