Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSchimmel, Majken K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:10Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:10Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-26en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05052010-145500en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32240
dc.description.abstractThe Castle Hayne Limestone (Middle Eocene, North Carolina), noted for its diverse macro-invertebrate fossils, was sampled to assess if early Cenozoic brachiopods from eastern North America record any traces of biotic interactions. Systematic surveys of two North Carolina quarries yielded 494 brachiopods, dominated by one species: Plicatoria wilmingtonensis (Lyell and Sowerby, 1845). Despite subtle variations in taphonomy, taxonomy, and drilling patterns, the two sampled quarries are remarkably similar in terms of quantitative and qualitative paleoecological and taphonomic patterns. Ninety-two brachiopod shells (18.6% specimens) contained a single circular hole. Majority of drillholes were singular, perpendicular to shell surface, and drilled from the outside. In addition, ventral valves were drilled slightly more frequently than dorsal ones and larger brachiopods contained more drillholes than smaller ones. However, the size of drillholes did not correlate with the size of brachiopods. The drillholes record â live-liveâ biotic interactions, which may represent either predatory attacks or parasitic infestations or combination of those two types of interactions. A notable fraction of specimens bears multiple drillholes, which is consistent with either parasitic nature of interactions or frequent failed predatory events. Drilling frequency was high in both quarries (24.5%); this high frequency reinforces other recent reports (from other continents and Cenozoic epochs) that drilling organisms may be a frequent predator or parasite of brachiopod prey or hosts. The number of case studies reporting high frequencies of drilling in brachiopods is still limited and thus insufficient to draw reliable generalizations regarding the causes and consequences of these occasionally intense ecological interactions.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSchimmel_MK_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectCastle Hayneen_US
dc.subjectEoceneen_US
dc.subjectBrachiopodsen_US
dc.subjectParasitismen_US
dc.subjectPredationen_US
dc.titleTRACES OF PREDATION/PARASITISM RECORDED IN EOCENE BRACHIOPODS FROM THE CASTLE HAYNE LIMESTONE, NORTH CAROLINA, U.S.A.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeosciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKowalewski, Michalen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberXiao, Shuhaien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRead, James Fredricken_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05052010-145500/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-05-05en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-05-20
dc.date.adate2010-05-20en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record