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dc.contributor.authorSamler, Jessica Anneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:12Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:12Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-24en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05052012-072852en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32244
dc.description.abstractThrips are major agricultural pests throughout much of the United States. More information is needed about sampling methods, management practices, and insecticide susceptibility to help better control this pest. A two year survey was conducted to determine the species present in southeast Virginia and the population characteristics of those species. Thrips were monitored using yellow sticky traps. Tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca, were the most abundant species. In general thrips populations began to build up beginning in April, peaked in August, and then started to decline. Differences in this trend were observed between species. A study was conducted in seedling soybean to evaluate the within-plant location of thrips, whether a plant subsample could be used for thrips monitoring, and to determine the thrips species complex present. Soybean thrips, Neohydatothrips variabilis, were the most prominent species present. The greatest density of thrips larvae was located in the terminal bud of the seedling and suggests that immature thrips aggregate. Neither of the proposed subsamples of plant material explained the variability in immature thrips numbers and at this time we recommend whole-plant sampling for obtaining the most accurate estimate of thrips populations in seedling soybean. Tobacco thrips, F. fusca, as well as a complex of other thrips species attack cotton and peanut seedlings and can cause significant yield loss to these crops in the mid-Atlantic U.S. Experiments were conducted in these two crops to assess the efficacy of a novel diamide insecticide cyantraniliprole applied as a liquid in-furrow at planting and post-plant emergence broadcast spray treatment to control thrips. In both cropping systems cyantraniliprole significantly reduced the number of immature thrips and reduced thrips feeding injury to the plants. In several instances cyantraniliprole treatments resulted in increased yield as compared to the non-insecticide treated control and yields which were statistically similar to those obtained with standard thrips control insecticides. Laboratory bioassays were conducted to evaluate the toxicity (LC50 values) of cyantraniliprole and two conventional insecticides against F. fusca adults. Results of these assays were inconclusive. At times F. fusca adults were susceptible to the insecticides, but the results could not be replicated consistently.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSamler_JA_T_2012.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpeanutsen_US
dc.subjectcyantraniliproleen_US
dc.subjectsamplingen_US
dc.subjectThysanopteraen_US
dc.subjectthripsen_US
dc.subjectcottonen_US
dc.subjectsoybeanen_US
dc.titleAbundance and Species Diversity of Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Cotton, Soybean, and Peanut in Southeast Virginia, and Evaluation of Cyantraniliprole for Thrips Managementen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHerbert, David Ames Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrewster, Carlyle C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKennedy, George G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKuhar, Thomas P.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05052012-072852/en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-05-05en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-05-25
dc.date.adate2012-05-25en_US


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